Category : newsletter

Newsletter: Vol. 4 No.1 December 2013

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For the Love of the Game:

Joseph Zeltsan of SAR and his Coach Vitaly Zaltsman


BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT




Vitaly Zaltsman(88K)



The last time I remember seeing it was at a tournament in NYC four years ago. It was during the medals ceremony after a full day of very intense matches. Students were collecting their medals and trophies and I came over and chatted with a top student player. His dad came over and joined us and suddenly the student looked at his dad and said “Hey Dad how about a game of chess. Just for fun.” And so at the end of a full days tournament, after finishing in the top three of his section, a game started at the rear of the final trophy ceremony “just for fun”. “Wow”, I thought as I watched the two set up and play, “that kid really loves chess.”

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6



Magnus Carlsen, The Mozart of Chess?

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT



With a first name that means “great” and is shared among 6 Norwegian Kings, Magnus Carlsen, the world’s number one highest ranked chess player is only 22. In a sport where child prodigies and genius at a young age occurs more often than in other sports/games, Carlsen continues to break age-related chess records.


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He became an international master (IM) at 11 and the second-youngest grandmaster (GM) achieving the title when he was 13. His rating continued
to rise after shattering more records when he was 17, becoming the first player to achieve a 2700 rating . In January 2010, at the age of 19, he became the youngest player to be ranked number one. His rating today is 2837.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 6

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Reti’s Endgame Problem: Chess“Multitasking”

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT




91 years ago the great Jewish Hungarian chess player Richard Reti published one of the most famous chess puzzles ever created.Known as the “Reti Endgame Study,” the problem is set up simply with single pawns and kings on the board.
Though it looks easy, Reti’s ideas are complex. His puzzle is one of the best examples of how pieces can become extremely powerful


CONTINUED ON PAGE 3


Kibbitz (285K)

Richard Reti 1889-1929


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when they “ multitask” or can be used in two or more different strategies.
As shown on the left, the problem is for white to move first and draw.
The solution here is based on the idea that the white King can multitask well or be used for two purposes at the same time. White moves .rst its king and depending on black’s reaction, stays on a diagonal path that allows it to EITHER defend its pawn on c6 allowing it to promote or prevent the black pawn on h5 from promoting.
The three main paths both players can choose are shown below.
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In all of these solutions, white moves first and then follows a diagonal so that it can when necessary, cause a draw. Traveling along diagonals, the white King can easily access the area on the board involving promotion of his queen, and at the same time police the area in the opposite corner to prevent black’s pawn from promoting.

For example in the first solution “Race to the End”, white still addresses both issues of protecting his pawn and preventing
the black pawn from promoting, by staying on the diagonal until his third move when he abruptly breaks off to promote his own pawn and achieve the draw.

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 5—

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The Famous Giuoco Piano Trap

BY MARK KURTZMAN




Opening traps are fascinating because they require very little knowledge, yet they can enable you to win quickly against a much stronger player…provided they don’t know the trap also.


Here we have the standard opening
moves of a basic
Giuoco Piano opening.
1. e4 e5
2. Nf3 Nc6
3. Bc4 Nd4
Black makes a very strange move
violating the opening principal
of moving the same piece twice.
Black’s e pawn is hanging as
well…or is it?
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4. Nxe5? White goes for the free pawn and falls immediately for the trap! This move looks so good for white
because it wins the center pawn and attacks the f7 square for a second time. If you have never seen this trap, it
is very easy to fall for.
4. …. Qg5 Black violates another opening principle of moving the queen out early, but traps have a life of their
own! The queen makes a double attack on the Knight on e5 and the pawn on g2.

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If 5. Ng4 then
black plays 5. …
d5 with discovered
attack against
the knight on g4
and white must
lose the knight or
the bishop on c4.

5. Nxf7 Qxg2
6. Rf1 Qxe4+
7. Be2
Can you find
checkmate for black?

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7. …Nf3# White’s bishop on e2 is pinned and white is checkmated in a commonly known checkmate called the
smothered mate! 7. …Nxc2+ was winning also, but not as strong as checkmate.


Of course, white could have traded knights on move 4 and black would have had nothing to show for his play. But
traps are based upon greed. Players love to steal the material…the juicy pawn on e4 in this case. Don’t be greedy…
and you will not lose quickly!

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“>
The Oldest Game

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT




Though newspapers and TV news can be full of scary stories, this summer the news changed as writers and reporters
covered the summer Olympics in London. How is it possible, I thought while watching Usain Bolt set a world record
in the 100 meter sprint, that runners keep getting better and better each Olympics as the winning times continue to fall?
Of course the athletes get better by working harder and putting their discipline to the goal of an Olympic medal every
four years but also technology is a big help. From the shoes to the types of body suits swimmers wear, to the design
of the tracks and pools, new technology allows players of the same ability to stand out, win, and set new records every
four years.


Chess is similar in that technology has helped child prodigies become grandmasters at a younger age. The internet
has had a tremendous effect on top level players but also on newcomers to the game as information on recently played
games and on how to improve is easily available almost everywhere and at any time. Games played by top players
today are much more complicated than those played one hundred years ago.


Going even further back, the very first chess games (following
mostly modern rules) were fairly simple as higher level strategies and even many common tactics were unknown. We see this in the earliest recorded chess game nearly 550 years ago, a match explained by Francesc de Castellvi, Bernat Fenollar, and Narcis de Vinyoles.

These three men recorded a chess game which follows most of our major current rules on how the pieces move. They were poets and chessplayers, with their poetry published in the first printed book in Spain by Lambertus Pamert, printed in 1474. In 1475 Castellvi, Fenollar, and Vinyoles wrote a poem called Scachs D’Amour (Chess of Love} which has the earliest game in its words and as part of its 64 verses.
15th

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The game, shown below in its final position (Checkmate just delivered), has many errors and would today be considered
a beginner’s game as both sides fail to castle, and black is forced \to exchange knights for bishops and rooks.

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Perhaps the biggest mistake is simply not seeing ahead to prevent checkmate. So, why are there so many blunders in this game? Probably because there was no such thing as blunders yet, the word had not even been invented. It’s the same reason why in 1900 the fastest men’s 100m sprint time was 11 seconds. Chess is so old that 550 years ago the game was new and fresh. There was no internet to read chess columns and share games and chess knowledge with people in countries thousands of miles away. We should be thankful for this technology, not take it for granted yet at the same time focus on what really matters in chess, the ideas in every game which can make chess beautiful and exciting.


Reti’s Endgame Puzzle (Continued From Page 2)


The key here is to have each move of the white king address both issues. By “multitasking” efficiently white can draw in every situation. Reti’s puzzle provides us with another example of chess imitating life. Though Reti probably did not intend it, his puzzle is a good example for us to consider today. The efficiency of the puzzle is due to its multitasking
ability. For parents and students, outside of chess, success in life can be also connected how well we multitask or “juggle” activities.

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Joseph Zeltsan

( Continued From Page 1)



I had the same feeling on a sticky and humid Sunday evening in August when I took a few subways out of Manhattan to Midwood to meet Joseph Zeltsan, an SAR Academy student who just .nished .fth grade and his coach IM Vitaly Zaltsman. Joseph, who started chess through Tri-State Chess’ curricular and after school chess, was one of our program’s rising stars.
After a series of chess lessons, over the past year and a half, Zeltsan’s USCF rating is now close to 1600. At the end of his school year, he also .nished second in overall in the Tri-State Chess Grand Prix competition behind Michael Levinson. This earned him a prize of $350 which could be used towards the purchase of chess books and equipment from The Chess Exchange store on East 88th street in Manhattan. More importantly was his reputation as SAR’s top player. With a great sense of humor, a maturity more akin to a freshman in high school and a knack for higher-level strategic thinking in chess, Joseph was known to his chess teachers as an unusually gifted chess talent.
“He wanted to study with me” said his classroom chess coach, Tri-State Chess Instructor Mike Karon, after one of his many conversations following their after school classes at SAR. “But I knew right away he was a special talent so I told him I cannot teach you, I am not the
right teacher for you and referred him to Vitaly Zaltsman,” an international master who is one of the top chess coaches in America.
“Come sit down”. Vitaly, a true gentleman , who looks and thinks much younger than his 70+ years greeted me warmly and I said hello to Joseph and his mom who taught him chess and is his biggest fan. The .rst thing I noticed was there was no board or pieces out.
“We played all day and even I am exhausted. Joseph replied in Russian in what I thought was agreemen “Oh no, he can play forever this kid he just doesn’t get tired.” Joseph replied again in Russian. Yes, as Joseph’s parents are immigrants, Joseph speaks Russian mostly with Vitaly. Despite the many decades separating each other, Vitaly and Joseph have a similar sense of humor and get along genuinely with mutual respect between them.
“So this is how we work.” Vitaly was ready to get down to business. We started at 11. “We went over a very beautiful game from Biel” (the 46th International Chess Festival in Switzerland).


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Magnus & Mozart

( Continued From Page 1)


Magnus is now is now old enough to have several lucrative endorsements, including a modeling contract that takes advantage of his famous scowl. His income from endorsements alone is said to be in excess of $1.5 million/year.
In 2004, in the Washington Post, International Master Lubomir Kavalek called Carlsen the Mozart of chess. Since then the phrase has been popularized and taken up by the press. So is it a good comparison?
Mozart of course was born at a di.erent time 1756 or 257 years ago. He learned music from his father Leopold Mozart who took him around the courts of Europe to perform at a very young age. Magnus was steered into serious chess when his family moved to Reykjavik, Iceland a chess loving nation
where Fischer defeated Spassky in 1972. Magnus travels a majority of the year now also with his father, an engineer, who like Leopold is his constant companion.
Mozart played harpsichord when he was only 3 and could play the piano and read music by the age of 5. He started composing when he was 6 and wrote his .rst symphony two years later at age 8. Magnus though started learning chess rather late for a child genius. He .rst started playing when he was 8.
Magnus has an amazing mind and memory and has an encyclopedia of games, positions, moves, and strategies he draws on. Mozart too had an amazing mind and memory and was able to compose many of his most famous and complex multiple line works almost as perfect music. Many Mozart original handwritten autograph scores or manuscripts are completely clean or without the typical composers’ mistakes, edits, and scribbles. He created some of his greatest works perfectly all in his head without the need for corrections.
Magnus Carlsen is currently the world chess champion !

–Continued on Page 8–

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Joseph Zeltsan

( (Continued From Previous Page)



We saw how the game was won. We really focused on how.” He was here joking about Wang Hao (pronounced HOW) the young prodigy who won the grandmaster section of the tournament against players like Carlsen and Nakamura.

“Joseph is a special player. But he has holes and these need to be filled in.” I had to ask a question about tournaments, after all Zaltsman knew and had played in tournaments himself against a wide range of famous players like Korchnoi, Reshevsky, and Benko. But I did not see a clock. “What about tournaments. Do you use and teach with a clock?” “No, he is not really ready” was the reply.

“So we look at games then we play each other, slowly, very slowly, move by move and then we focus on the endgame-you know both Tal and Kasparov had weaknesses in the endgame.” “We do exercises, King vs. Queen, King with Rooks and Pawns. We practice and it is hard work.
You know chess requires hard work, discipline and memorizing too. We usually finish around this time.”




I looked at my watch. It was 6:50. Joseph spied a friend at another table and jumped up “I’ll be back” he said. “OK I think we are done.” Vitaly said. The three of us, Joseph’s Mom, myself, and Vitaly chatted about the park, its proximity to Edward Murrow High School, a Brooklyn public school with a long history of chess dominance at a national level. Suddenly Joseph was back. “We are going to play a bit OK Mom?” “Hey, it’s time to go.” his
Mom insisted, “So, say goodbye and let’s hit the road. “Oh man,” Joseph walked back to his friend.

“See, he just loves chess.” Vitaly said. Taking in all that I had seen and what Vitaly had told me, I thought to myself, the source of rare kids like Joseph’s success must be more complex. What is more important the inborn
personality or talent or the influence of the outside environment made up of family, teachers and friends?
For it is every teacher’s dream to get kids to love learning.
Joseph clearly had both, the nature, talent, personality
and the maturity, and a great teacher who was a perfect fit for him. Yet most kids don’t have either and that is the challenge, to give them at least one, the right environment. By watching and recognizing strong teaching, focusing on the old-fashioned techniques that work, discipline, and even memorization, we can create great players and more kids who just “love chess”.

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Perhaps continuing the comparison in this way doesn’t really help decide whether the comparison is just. But the core of what makes chess special and what makes music too so powerful, what makes both of them art, are simply the great ideas. And here the comparison is a good one.

Kavalek made the Mozart remark after after looking at Magnus’ amazing endgame from the 2004 game Carlsen vs.
Ernst in Wijk aan Zee. Kavalek compares the sacri.ces and beautiful .nal checkmate to Fischer vs. Byrne in 1956.
Fischer was also 13 when he played his famous game. The end of the game and .nal checkmate, all “composed” by
Magnus are shown below:

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Private Chess Lessons

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It is possible to become a strong player by studying independently complimented by participating in a scholastic chess program. However, most of the players who .nish at the top of their sections at scholastic chess tournaments are taking weekly lessons with a chess coach. In fact, more than 80% of trophy winners at Nationals (top 25) are taking lessons with a chess master or other highly quali.ed instructor.


One of the best ways to improve your game is to bring the score of your tournament games to your chess coach and have them analyze the game with you. To go over the moves of the game and see where your mistakes were and to see how you could have improved is of paramount importance. Depending upon your level, instructors will also help you to develop an opening repertoire, as well as to provide specialized endgame training


At Tri-State Chess, our sta. of highly experienced and well trained instructors are teaching after school and curricular chess programs at over 20 schools throughout the Greater NY area. These are the same coaches that are available for private lessons.

Standard rates for one of our instructors to come to your home for a weekly one hour lesson start at $80. Senior instructors
with more experience and proven results have rates that are slightly higher at $100-$120/hr. We also have instructors who have
developed many individual and National Championship Teams. They are charging $150.

We o.er special rates of $60/hr. for students who take the lesson in our store in Manhattan at
325 East 88th Street between 1st and 2nd avenue.

It is not necessary to sign up for a package of lessons in advance. You can try out a lesson and see if you like it and pay as you
go. If the instructor is not the right .t, you can try a di.erent one next time, and you can cancel at any time without obligations.
For best results it is suggested to take lessons weekly. Players who are very serious should take a 1 ½ -2 hour lessons weekly, or twice a week.

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ACROSS

1 Italian name for strong bishop position in center of triangle of 3 pawns.
2 A straight line attack or capture of a less valuable piece which can not move be
cause doing so would expose a more valuable piece behind it.
3 Number of points a player has at the beginning of the game.
4 A straight line attack to a more valuable piece, which moves to avoid capture and
exposes behind it a less valuable piece which can be taken.
5 Number of pawns white has at the start.


DOWN

1 One of the best defensive moves Do it early.
2 Best piece to use to make a fork.
3 Total number of queens one could have in a game.


DIRECTIONS


Use a dark pen to fill in all the pink squares of the
chessboard black hole in outer space.

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Newsletter: Vol. 3 No.2 March 2012

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Henry Bird (88K)
The Angry Bird
By C.K. Damrosch


The angriest bird is named Henry Edward Bird. Why is Mr. Bird so angry? Well, 150 years after he developed his unique opening 1.f4, people call it “The Bird.” Yes, there is a tradition in Chess openings for naming them after animals (The Orangutang comes to mind), but the proper name for this opening is “Bird’s Opening.”
Here is the unique and funny story of Mr. Bird’s “invention.”

Henry was a hero before even stepping to the board, for he is one of the few chess luminaries that actually held down a day job. He took 15 years off from high level chess to earn a degree in Accountancy and write a book about the railway system in his native England.

When he returned to competitive play, he was quite nervous. He sat down to his first game, and hand shaking, he accidentally moved his f pawn instead of his e pawn! Rather than admit to his opponent that he had made such a hideous mistake, Bird continued the game with the moves e3, nf3, b3, and Bb2 and Bird’s Opening was born. Henry liked the position he obtained so much, he would play it for much of his career.

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The Angry Bird
By C.K. Damrosch


Kibbitz (285K)


Kibbitzing is a great word that comes to us from Yiddish, from a Hebrew version of the German word kiebitzen.

Originally it just meant being an onlooker or a spectator, but over time it developed a negative connotation of being a busybody or giving intrusive, meddlesome, or unwanted advice.

Originally it just meant being an onlooker or a spectator, but over time it developed a negative connotation of being a busybody or giving intrusive, meddlesome, or unwanted advice.

Similarly in the Chess word, at one time it was a terrible insult to be called a kibbitzer, that is one who watched someone else’s chess game and made comments. In certain settings, like say Central Park on a sunny summer day where 4 players are sharing a chess table and two park benches playing blitz, a little kibbitzing just makes everything more fun.

But there has to be rules, for it can be the worst thing in the world to be playing a tough enough game against one player, only to have him peppered with moves from the peanut gallery. From giving a lot of siumuls, I can tell you its easier to beat 20 students all quietly playing their own boards than 20 students all playing one board and talking out their moves.

That being said, here are some rules for being a “good” kibbtitzer.

1. Never discuss a move that can be played. Discuss moves that are no longer possible.

example: “If you hadn’t of let him take your knight, you could have forked his king and queen on f7 with it.”

15. If you are with several kibbitzers, communicate with knowing looks, rolling eyes and don’t be afraid to whisper in someone’s ear, “do you think he sees the mate in 2?”
Never tell someone to resign. Its their game

General comments about a position are generally allowed–a little humor never hurts–
examples: “My kingdom for a white bishop.” “Black is spiny like a porcupine.” Or quietly humming the Imperial Death March from Star Wars as one player mounts an attack….

My favorite kibbitz story involves a famous African American player who was playing a tournament game against a Russian. Actually two Russians, because his opponent had a friend who was openly kibbitzing about the game in Russian–at the board! Our hero allowed this to continue for the entire game, until finally he pronounced in his own fluent Russian, “no, even if he moves his rook, I play h7 and you are lost.”


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GM Watching
By C.K. Damrosch


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One the great benefits of being a chess player and living in the New York area are the numerous opportunities you have to actually meet face to face with a living Grandmaster. Although the title has gotten somewhat easier to get in recent years, there are still only a few hundred GM’s in the world.

Somedays, it seems like they all live in New York!

On one such day recently I went to hear newly minted GM Robert Hess speak at the Jewish Community Center on the upper west side. Robert was addressing a contingent of the Cross Generation Chess program started by Renee Yarzig.

“One of the easiest moves I’ve had to make in my career has been to continue my education.” Hess continued that it was no decision at all if he should go to Yale or pursue Chess full time, “Chess will always be there.”

After his talk, Hess took on all comers at blitz. After the crowd had been defeated (myself included), GM Lev Alburt took over and we were treated to several rounds of Grandmaster Blitz.

Here’s a photo of the two hard at work:

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The Angry Bird (continued from page 1)

The Classic Bird Formation


Actually far from angry, Bird was known as a rotund, jovial fellow always up for a game.
He suffered from ill health in his later years, prompting a colleague to remark, “His play is the same as his health,
its always alternating between being dangerously ill and being dangerously well.”

Here are some examples of Bird being dangerously well:

WHITE TO MOVE AND MATE IN 3

Bird vs. Amateur, London 1886

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BLACK TO MOVE AND MATE IN 3

William Steinitz vs Bird, London 1866

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Bird could also play black, and in fact has another opening named after him, Bird’s Defense, a response to the Ruy Lopez.
Here he uncorked a potent attack on Steinitz: Finally, for the advanced class, check out this crazy position. Somehow Mr. Bird and Mr. Pitschel have managed to obtain a pawn structure so bizarre, it had to trigger a fabulous finish.




1.f4 d5 2. e3 Nf6 3. b3 e6 4. Bb2 Be7 5. Bd3 b6 6. Nc3 Bb7 7.Nf3
Nbd7 8. 0-0 0-0 9. Ne2 c5 10. Ng3 Qc7 11. Ne5 Nxe5 12. Bxe5


Position after 14 …. Nxh5–let the fireworks begin!!!
15.Bxh7+ Kxh7 16. Qxh5+ Kg8 17. Bxg7 Kxg7 18. Qg4+ Kh7 19.
Rf3 e5 20. Rh3+ Qh6 21. Rxh6+ Kxh6 22. Qd7 Bf6 23. Qxb7 Kg7
24. Rf1 Rab8 25. Qd7 Rfd8 26. Qg4+ Kf8 27. fxe5 Bg7 28. e6
Rb7 29. Qg6 f6 30. Rxf6+ Bxf6 31. Qxf6+ Ke8 32. Qh8+ Ke7 33.
Qg7+ Kxe6 34. Qxb7 Rd6 35. Qxa6 d4 36. exd4 cxd4 37. h4 d3
38. Qxd3 Black Resigns.

(continued on page 7 )



Lasker/Bauer Amsterdam
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(continued from page 6)

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WHITE TO MOVE AND MATE IN ONE



WHITE TO MOVE AND MATE IN TWO



MATE IN THREE

Black to move
         White to move

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By Mark Kurtzman



In the diagram below, the game appears drawn. In almost all cases, when serious tournament players compete, they agree to a draw when there are no winning chances.

Black played Rg2+ in this position. White replied with Rf2 hoping for a rook trade, but black played his rook back to g7. The position continued with similar rook moves being played by both sides leading nowhere. White, realizing he would lose the game on time if this would continue, started saying “draw, it’s a draw.” Black said nothing and did not acknowledge his opponent. The Chief Tournament Director then appeared to observe the final moves of the game. They continued to play and when white realized he had only seconds left, he started to scream, “Draw, you can’t win this position. It’s a draw!” The opponent continued to play and the White player turned to the tournament director expecting him to intervene, but he did not.
In this game, however, it was the final round of an important championship tournament. And there was a lot of prize money at stake.$7,600 to the winner!

Everything seems equal, except White had 1 minute left on the clock in sudden death and black had almost 2 minutes.

27th National Chess Congress
Philadelphia, PA
December 20, 1996


This game clearly should have been a draw, in which case both players would have received a little over $5000 sharing 1st and 2nd place.

Once the clock is stopped, the player can then make a claim to the tournament director, and the director will then rule on whether or not the claim will be upheld.

Since White never stopped the clock, he never officially made a claim, and had to watch the final seconds slip away on his clock without any recourse.It was an expensive lesson!




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© Tri State Chess, All Rights Reserve

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To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess has introduced new “Grand Prix” prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix” points. At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at Tri-State’s concession stands at tournaments or at:

The Chess Exchange store at 325 E. 88 Street
between 1st and 2nd Ave. New York, NY (212) 289-5997

For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:

  Awarded Grand Prix Points /Tournament
1st place SECTION RANK (Finish)
2ndt place 6
3rd place 4
4th place 2
5th place 1

If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.
For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get 6.7 points.
Top 10 Grand Prix point leaders will be listed in each newsletter. Grand Prix Point Standings can always be
found online at our website. At the end of the season, the top five players with the most Grand Prix points will

GIANT $$-CASH-$$ certificates to be used at Tri-State stores in the amounts of:
– 1st $500 BONUS Certificate
– 2nd $350 BONUS Certificate
– 3rd $250 BONUS Certificate
– 4th $150 BONUS Certificate
– 5th $100 BONUS Certificate

PLUS
A special personalized Grand Prix engraved plaque. Plaques and a book prize of the players choice
also will be awarded for 6th – 10th place finishers
So if you are finishing in the top 5 of your section keep track of those Grand Prix points. They add up
quickly and might become serious cash to get you some great chess stuff at the end of the season!!

GRAND PRIX WINNERS
2010-2011

1st
Place
Sean Sookram
M.S. 15 Bronx
$500 + 1st Place Plaque 52.92 POINTS
2nd
Place
Adam Avnet
Rodeph Sholom NYC
$350 + 2nd Place Plaque 20.71 POINTS
3rd
Place
Ottavio Pasquini
Lycee Francais de NY
$250 + 3rd Place Plaque 18.00 POINTS
4th
Place
Ericbern Martinez
P.S. 279 Bronx
$150 + 4th Place Plaque 16.25 POINTS
5th
Place
Benjamin Cole
Ramaz Lower School NYC
$100 + 5th Place Plaque 15.91 POINTS
6th
Place
Kenneth Rodriguez
P.S. 226 Bronx
Book+Plaque 15.17 POINTS
7th
Place
Michael Levinson
IS 278 Brooklyn
Book+Plaque 14.67 POINTS
8th
Place
Meyer Levinson-Blount
SAR Academy Riverdale
Book+Plaque 14.08 POINTS
9th
Place
Eitan Genger
Heschel School NYC
Book+Plaque 13.33 POINTS
10th
Place
Angel Mejia
P.S. 226 Bronx
Book+Plaque 13.00 POINTS

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Newsletter: Vol. 3 No.1 November 2011

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Kasparov training Stretching Your Brain: How to Warm Up for a Chess Tournament
BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

Many chess playing students who participate in tournaments want to know what are the best things to do before the event. If you watch your Mom or Dad when
they exercise or if you are in a special soccer, ballet, or sports activity, you might notice that stretching is an
important part of the activity. A good way to prepare for
Brain
a tournament is also to stretch, to stretch your body and mind.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

Paul Morphy: America’s First Kid Chess Wizard BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

Grownups hate losing to kids. About 160 years ago the famous Hungarian chess player Johann Lowenthal visited the United States and as a favor played a 12 year old named Paul Morphy. When they met, Lowenthal patted the young
Morphy on the head, like he was saying “You’re just a kid-how sweet that you will allow me to beat you.” As soon as Morphy moved though, Lowenthal’s proud attitude changed and his face turned more serious and white like a ghost.
People watching the game couldn’t believe it as Morphy quickly took the advantage and Lowenthal’s eyes supposedly widened, his eyebrows shooting up higher with each move. Morphy won that game and the next two games that
Lowenthal was brave enough to play. –CONTINUED ON PAGE 5–

Brain Brain

– 1 –


YOU MAKE THE CALL


By Mark Kurtzman

chess


The game is very close in position and material. It is White’s turn and he thinks he sees checkmate. White plays
Qh4+ and after black plays Kg8, White will play Qh7++.
So White plays his Qh4+ move and black instantly says the move is illegal. He stops the clock (this should be
done any time you make any kind of claim), and points out that White’s King is in check from the black bishop on
c5. White agrees and takes the move back. Both players agree that 2 minutes should be added to black’s clock
because of white’s illegal move. This is the typical penalty. Then white plays Kh1 instead, to avoid the check,
presses the clock and play continues. Is this the proper course of action?


YOU MAKE THE CALL


Everything seems to make sense here. White played an illegal move, admitted it, and 2 minutes was added
to black’s clock. However, what many players seem not to realize is that an illegal move can also carry
the additional penalty of “touch move.” Because white touched the queen when he played Qh4, he must
move the queen if ANY legal move with the Queen is possible. Do you see one? White can move the
Queen to f2 to block the check. Therefore, this is the only move that white can play even though it will
cause him to lose the Queen and probably the game.

Sometimes players get so excited about calling the illegal move and getting the extra minutes on their
clock, but they miss out on the major penalty of an illegal move which is the “touch move” rule. If it was
not possible to escape from the check by moving the Queen, the only penalty would have been the time
penalty and play would have resumed without any other penalty.

So the next time your opponent plays an illegal move, take the extra minutes, and keep in mind that the
touch move rule applies!


-2-

Header
BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT
Old Men Of Chess Face Off
To Decide World Champion

Chess is similar to Olympic gymnastics or pro Tennis in
that most players reach its highest level when they are
young adults between the ages of 17 and 25. Top
players keep getting younger as more players are now
becoming Grandmasters (one of the highest levels of
chess) in their teens at age 17 or even younger.
However, next year men with a few grey hairs will be
playing each other to find out who is the world’s top
player. Boris Gelfand age 42 will play Viswanathan
Anand age 41 in Chennai, India. Gelfand, who is
relatively unknown outside the chess world, won the
right to challenge Anand by winning Candidate
Matches in May. He had to earn a spot in the Candidate
Matches too, which he did by winning the World Cup
in 2009. Candidate matches have been run by FIDE ,
the international chess association, since 1950 to
determine the World Champ.
Though they won’t be showing up with canes, Gelfand
and Anand are the oldest players to play for the world
champ title since Alekhine (41) beat Bogoljubow (45)
in 1934.
It is actually refreshing to see that experience can be an
important factor in chess though the aggressive style
that is often tied to younger players is sometimes
needed to give one player an edge. Gelfand is known
for a more traditional style of play and he often chooses
openings that result in draws for both players.

NEWSBITES
Old Men Of Chess Face Off
To Decide World Champion
Against Anand he will probably change his style slightly and
take on more risk to try to win the match.
Out of a total of 65 recorded games between Anand and
Gelfand Anand won 16 or 25%, Gelfand won 6 or 9% and 43
or 66% were draws. Given this history, we predict the match
will be over quickly with Anand retaining his title.
This is the first time a major chess tournament event will take
place in India. As Anand is playing on his home turf and he
is treated as a national hero, there is expected to be
tremendous excitement and crowds of people in Chennai.

Chess has become extremely popular in India, the world’s second largest country in terms of number of people. India has 1.2 billion people and a history of respecting education
and analytical thinking, two ingredients needed for chess to become popular. The Anand/Gelfand match will be all over the Indian news.
Who knows, maybe some of the kids watching will be future grandmasters or even world champions, imagining themselves in Anand’s shoes.


– 3 –


– 4 –

 Paul Morphy (Continued from Page 1)


Morphy’s unusual talent for chess was noticeable when he first learned the game by watching his dad (a judge) play his uncle Ernest. One day,
after his dad won, Paul came over to the board and said “let me show you how uncle Ernest should have won.” He then replayed the game by
memory correcting BOTH players’ moves.

By the time Paul was 9 he beat just about every strong player in New Orleans where he lived, and faced and won against many of the top chess
players in the US. But Morphy was still not considered a world class player because he had not yet been to Europe where most of the greatest
players lived. After all, going to Europe back then involved taking a boat for two weeks to get across the Atlantic. There just were no planes yet!
When Morphy finally went to Europe about 15 years later when he was in his 20s, he visited England and France defeating top players including
Daniel Harrwitz and Adolf Anderssen. Some players like Howard Staunton simply refused to play him and became experts at coming up
with new, creative excuses.

One of Morphy’s most famous games took place in 1858 when he was 21 at a show, the opera Norma at the Paris Opera House. Morphy never
Morphy seized the center, developed his pieces with power, boxed in the two challengers and with a brilliant queen
sacrifice, ended the game in 17 moves. Whew, “Now I can enjoy the show” Morphy might have thought “and I played a
pretty good game too!” he might have modestly thought.


Morphy has been called the Pride and Sorrow of chess because after returning to the US when he was 24, he stopped
playing and focused on making money as a lawyer.

Many disagree with this nickname. In 1850, he had already cut back on how much chess he was playing and went to
college when he was 13, graduating in 4 years from Spring Hill College with a BA and then stayed for a Masters in Math
and Philosophy. When he was 20 he got an LLB degree from University of Louisiana (now Tulane) and passed the bar
by supposedly memorizing the complete laws and codes of Louisiana!

Unfortunately, Morphy was not successful as a lawyer. One of the reasons possibly was due to his fame since many
visitors to his law office just wanted to talk about or play chess. Yet he had used his mind in a productive way by
applying chess skills to his job and every day life. We should follow his example and take from chess, skills and
experiences that help other areas and allow us to lead a richer life that contributes to our society and the world.
heard it and wanted to listen to the music but the two people he was with, The Duke of Brunswick and Count Isouard
already heard Norma and wanted to play chess against Morphy as a team, in their box seat which was a private very
fancy open room with seats right next to the stage.

As the game started and continued past the opening, the two challengers began talking about it loudly as they noticed that
Morphy who wanted to finish the game and listen to Norma, was creating a chess masterpiece. The opera singers started
moving closer to the box to see what was going on as the show continued.


– 5 –


ANNOTATED BY: MARK KURTZMAN

White: Paul Morphy Black: Duke of Brunswick & Count Isouard


– 6 –

Brain Stretch  (Continued From Page 1)


One way to remember the the TriState-Chess tournament prep routine is to remember the code word
SWEET. SWEET stands for Sleep, Workout, Eat, Early, and Tactics.


Rest will help you think faster, better, and deeper allowing you to see further ahead and remember chess
ideas. Try to get at least 7+ hours of sleep the night before.


If you can, it’s a good idea to get some exercise early in the morning before a tournament. This might be
walking to pick up milk with Mom or a quick game of basketball with Dad. Even walking up and down
stairs or stretching your body can be helpful. Kasparov would regularly do an hour or two of rowing or
swimming before matches.


Your body and brain need good food before a chess match. Try to eat a healthy meal before a
tournament. A breakfast of chess champions might be a healthy cereal like Wheaties, Raisin Bran or the
king of healthy food, oatmeal with some juice, a yogurt, and some fruit like a banana. Keeping fruit or
sports bars with you can help to keep you from getting hungry during a match.


Show up at least a half-hour before the tournament. Think of the expression “The Early Bird Catches
the Worm” (The Early Player Checkmates the King). This will relax you as you get familiar with the
building, especially where the restrooms and/or water fountains are located. Bring an extra fleece or
sweater with you in case it gets too cold.


Finally, take a ½ hour before you leave and review some simple chess ideas. For beginners, playing a
game like simple pawn football can help. Each side gets 4 pawns and a king. To win you must
checkmate the king just like in real chess. Try also some random mate in one problems. More
advanced players can choose 3-5 random mate in threes or fours to complete from a good puzzle
workbook. Make sure you do puzzles you have not seen before.

These 5 steps should help you get ready for our tournaments. So give SWEET a try. It will help you
have more fun at tournaments and improve your results.


– 7 –

INSTRUCTIONS


INSTRUCTIONS
Find the words below in the chessboard. Each word’s letters are spaced out on the board in a knight pattern.
For example, the word MATE begins with the letter M on square F1 jumping like a knight to G3 gives you
the A, F5 gives you the T, and h6 gives you the E. Once you find a word, look at which letter is highlighted
in yellow. Next to the word write down the square using chess notation. In our example, the T in MATE is
highlighted which is on f5, so write in f5 next to the word MATE on the square line. Next to the square is a
# or number space. Convert the square to a number by adding the column number (f=6) and the row number
(5)=5 so our word MATE has 6+5=11 as its number #. Add the numbers for all the clues and enter it on the
TOTAL line. Subtract 44 from the total, Add 7 to the result then divide it by 14. Do the math and you
have your answer.


-8-



– 9 –


– 10 –

Grand Prix Rules


To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess has introduced new “Grand Prix”
prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix”
points. At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at
Tri-State’s concession stands at tournaments or at:


The Chess Exchange store at 325 E. 88 Street
between 1st and 2nd Ave. New York, NY (212) 289-5997


For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:
SECTION RANK
(Finish)
Grand Prix Points Awarded/Tournament
1st place 10
2nd place 6
3rd place 4
4th place 2
5th place 1


If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.

For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get
6.7 points.


– 11 –


– 12 –


A guy gets on a long-distance flight. He’s just getting comfortable when somebody sits down next to
him. He looks up and wow, it’s Garry Kasparov.

Kasparov basks for a moment in the recognition. Some way into the flight, the meals are cleared
away and Garry produces an elegant little wooden travel chess set. He begins to play.

After a while Kasparov asks the guy whether he would like to play chess to kill time. The guy replies,
“Hey Garry, You think I don’t know who you are? I can’t compete with a world champion.” Kasparov
replies, “‘How about if I play left handed?”

The guy thinks about this for a minute, then agrees. He is demolished in 8 moves, and is
inconsolable for the rest of the journey.

On landing he meets his friend, who asks him how the flight was. “It was terrible,” he says.
“Completely humiliating. I played chess with Garry Kasparov and he beat me in spite of him playing
left-handed!”

His friend replies – “Ha! He fooled you! Garry Kasparov is left-handed!!”


– 13 –


– 14 –

November 2011 – February 2012

NOVEMBER 2011

November 5, 2011
Browning Chess Tournaments

10:00 am
52 East 62nd St., NYC
Shernazkennedy@aol.com
(516) 991-7509

November 6, 2011
PS 116 Chess Tournament
s
NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
210 East 33rd St., NYC
www.NYChesskids.com

November 13, 2011
Hunter College Elementary School

Tournaments +1 other event
Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94th Street, NYC
Sunil Weeramantry
www.NSCFChess.org

British International School of NY
20 Waterside Plaza, NYC
Beatriz Marinello
917-553-4522
Beatriz@chesseducators.com
http://www.chesseducators.com

November 18, 2011- 11/20/2011
2011 GRADE SCHOOL

NATIONALS (K-12)
US Chess Federation (USCF)
Dallas, Texas

November 20, 2011
PS 9 CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP IV

10:00 am
TRI-STATE CHESS
(212) 289-5997
Info@TriStateChess.com
www.TriStateChess.com
Tournament Site: 100 West 84th
Street, NYC

DECEMBER 2011.

December 3, 2011
Browning Chess Tournaments

10:00 am
52 East 62nd St., NYC
Shernazkennedy@aol.com
(516) 991-7509

December 4, 2011 –
PS 77 – Lower Lab School
Chess Tournaments

9:30 am
NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
www.NYChesskids.com

December 18, 2011
PS 116 Chess Tournaments and 1
other event<
br />
9:30 am
NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
210 East 33rd St., NYC
www.NYChesskids.com

PS 158 CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP XV
10:00 am
TRI-STATE CHESS
(212) 289-5997
Info@TriStateChess.com
www.TriStateChess.com
Tournament Site: 1458 York Ave.
NYC

JANUARY 2011.

January 7, 2012
Browning Chess Tournaments

10:00 am
52 East 62nd St., NYC
Shernazkennedy@aol.com
(516) 991-7509

January 8, 2012
Hunter College Elementary School

Tournaments +1 other event
Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94th Street, NYC
Sunil Weeramantry
www.NSCFChess.org

January 15, 2012
PS 116 Chess Tournaments

NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
210 East 33rd St., NYC
www.NYChesskids.com

January 22, 2012
PS 334 Chess Tournaments and 1

other event
100 West 77th St., NYC
Michael Poukchanski
michael@chesskingdom.com

SAR ACADEMY CHESS
CHAMPIONSHIP IX

10:00 am
TRI-STATE CHESS
(212) 289-5997
Info@TriStateChess.com
www.TriStateChess.com
Tournament Site: 655 West 254th St.
Riverdale, NY

January 28, 2012-1/29/2012
2012 GREATER NY

CHAMPIONSHIPS
Chess Center of NY
New Yorker Hotel West 34th St. and
8th Ave., NYC
ChessCentr@aol.com
www.chesscenter.cc
Steve Immitt

FEBRUARY 2011.

February 4, 2012
PS 41 Chess Tournaments

9:00 am
Jeremy Scheinbach
PS41Chess@Gmail.com

February 5, 2012
PS 77 – Lower Lab School

Chess Tournaments
9:30 am
NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
www.NYChesskids

February 11, 2012
Browning Chess Tournaments

10:00 am
52 East 62nd St., NYC
Shernazkennedy@aol.com
(516) 991-7509

February 12, 2012
Hunter College Elementary School

Tournaments +1 other event
Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94th Street, NYC
Sunil Weeramantry
www.NSCFChess.org

PARK EAST CHESS
CHAMPIONSHIP II

10:00 am
TRI-STATE CHESS
(212) 289-5997
Info@TriStateChess.com
www.TriStateChess.com
Tournament Site: 164 East 68th
Street, NYC

February 18, 2012-2/20/2012
US AMATEUR TEAM EAST (USATE)

9:00 am
Parsippany Hilton Hotel
Parsippany, New jersey
Steven Doyle
ESDoyle@aol.com

February 19, 2012
PS 116 Chess Tournaments

NY Chess Kids
Saudin Robovic
210 East 33rd St., NYC
www.NYChesskids.com


– 15 –


– 16 –





















Queens vs. Kings: Why Women Chessplayers Should Have Equality With Men
BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Last month in St. Louis, Gata Kamsky the second highest rated US player (2808), won the 2011 US Championship title and a $42,000 prize. At the same location, Anna Zatonskih the highest rated woman (2506), won the Women’s US Championship and an $18,000 prize.
If chess is a game where you mostly think and doesn’t use the body’s muscles like other sports, why are the highest rated women often rated 200-300 points lower, and get less money in prizes? In scholastic chess, such as at Tri-State Chess tournaments, girls and boys are equal.
—-CONTINUED ON PAGE 3—-


Chess and the Founding Fathers: Franklin & Jefferson’s Passion
for the Game

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


At the beginning of the summer we will celebrate a special birthday. It is not the birthday of your friend or relative. On July 4th, 2011 our country the United States of America will be 235 years old. Two hundred thirty five years ago, the leaders of our new country signed a very famous paper, the Declaration of Independence.
Many of these “Founding Fathers” played chess including the most famous signer Benjamin Franklin, and the man who wrote the Declaration, Thomas Jefferson.










Benjamin Franklin was an unusual man who was interested in many different subjects and was successful in almost everything he tried. He was a printer, publisher, businessman, politician, and a scientist who flew a kite in a famous experiment to prove lightning is electricity.

—-CONTINUED ON PAGE. 3—-


-1-








To Queenside Castle or not to Queenside Castle?

That is the Question

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

When kids first learn about castling they often are still weak overall players without too much experience. They are often told to castle as soon as possible and on the side of the King or to castle Kingside or “SHORT”. While a majority of the time this is sound advice for beginners, for players who either have played a few tournaments or are comfortable with all the pieces and basic rules an strategies of chess, when and how to castle can be very important and involves sometimes castling “LONG” or Queenside.


Overall, queenside castling can be risky as it puts the King closer to the center of the board. This risk must be looked at when thinking of the more special cases when queenside castling can work out.


There are three basic reasons or board situations when you might want to castle queenside:


KINGSIDE CASTLING IS NO LONGER AN OPTION

Castling is an important move that can give one an instant defensive advantage. However there are times when you are prohibited from castling on one side of the board. If you move your king you cannot castle on either side. However if you move a rook, you cannot castle on the side that the rook is on. If you had to move your kingside rook you can only castle queenside. You also cannot castle into check, out of check, or through a check. If you have any of these situations on the kingside of the board you can probably only castle queenside.


POSITIONING YOUR ROOK

Though Queenside castling is often harder (You must take out another piece (the queen) to clear the way between the King and the Rook), its final position leaves the rook with whom you castled without any pieces in front of it, which can be a strong attacking position. As shown on the right, this can result sometimes in the rook controlling the whole “d” file. If this strengthens your position, you should castle queenside.
– —-CONTINUED ON PAGE 4 —–




-2-







Chess and the Founding Fathers (Continued from the front page)


Franklin also enjoyed playing chess and even wrote a short essay called “The Morals of Chess.” Franklin was famous for his practical ideas for how to live and for creating expressions such as “Early to bed, early to rise keeps a man healthy wealthy and wise.” In his chess essay, he delivered similar advice stressing the idea of doing to others (on the chessboard) what you ideally wish them to do for you. He mentions how chess players learn to be careful and use caution and think positively, He warns about being unfair and even specifically tells players how “you shouldn’t sing nor whistle . . nor make a tapping with your feet on the floor . . to bother the other player while he
is thinking.”


Franklin’s friend and one of his most challenging chessboard rivals was Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the Declaration of Independence and later on became the third US president. Jefferson loved to play chess and owned several books on chess. Recently, at Jefferson’s home Monticello, which he designed and built, archeologists poking through Jefferson’s garbage found two small round balls, each about the size of two marbles.
Jefferson’s House (Monticello) Designed by him!At first they had no idea what they were.
However, one of the archeologists must have been a chess player when she shouted excitedly “Egads, Eureka, those are the tops of pawns.” Given Jefferson’s great sense of humor, Jefferson might have even




broken off the heads of the pawns in front of his opponent or the person with whom he was playing. It is easy to picture him saying to an opponent like Franklin “now that we played a standard game, let’s take away a few pawns to make it more fun!

Queens vs. Kings (Continued from the front page)

But even at our tournaments, parents and kids too tend to look at chess as a game for boys. In families where brothers and sisters play it is rare where the sister will be the better player. Her brothers often will receive most of the parents’ support, especially for becoming a higher level player and even for starting out as a beginner.

The real reason for there being so few women Grandmasters can be traced back to when kids first start to play. In a famous 1986 study of why there are so few women at the top of the chess world, Chabris and Glickman show that the answer is in the numbers; boys are starting out at chess in much greater numbers.

Though top woman players like Susan Polgar are trying to reverse this trend encouraging more girls to start out with chess through special all girls teams and events, there are similar cultural forces that keep women on a separate track as they get older.

Women’s Chess at its highest level is still dominated by players from countries from the former soviet union like, Russia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan. The current US Champion for example is Anna Zatonskih (born and raised in the Ukraine) who just won her fourth US Champion Title two weeks ago in a match against Tatev Abrahamyan (born and raised in Armenia.).

Though these and other top women players now live in the US, their country of origin is very important. Culturally, the countries of the former Soviet Union have more traditional views of men and women.

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 4—


-3-









Queenside Castling (Continued from the page 2)



STORMING PAWNS

If your opponent castles first Kingside, you might want to castle queenside so you can use your pawns to attack your opponent’s king without weakening your own castle. If you plan to use pawns to attack, castling on the same side as your opponent can be costly as you must convert your pawns from a defensive role to offensive soldiers.


The diagram on the right shows a good example from the 1925 game between Alekhine and Marshall. Here Alekhine’s earlier queenside castle (move 15) allows him great flexibility in attacking (Storming) Marshall’s King and castled pieces here after move 21 f6
These three basic ideas are a good beginner’s foundation for understanding the Queenside castle. Try them out, you will begin to see that sometimes the extra effort of the Queenside castle is well rewarded.







Queens vs. Kings (Continued from the page 3)

There was no feminist movement on a national scale in these countries that was like the movement in this country in the late sixties and seventies. They are therefore used to the traditional attitudes towards women that support a separation for women at chess’ professional level.


With cultural forces keeping girls from starting chess and others keeping them from being equal at the top levels, what is a good solution?


Perhaps encouraging separate girls events can help bring in greater numbers of girls to the game. However, once they climb to higher levels they should be allowed to compete equally.

By getting rid of any separate older women’s track for chess, girls would have an equal “bridge” to higher level chess where there would be equal opportunity at the highest level. We look forward someday, not too far in the future to seeing a special women chess player’s name followed by two words only: World Champion

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Chess Ratings: The Inside Scoop on How USCF Provisional Ratings Are Calculated


BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Even more than winning, how to lose is critical for kids to learn. How to learn from mistakes is a lifelong lesson we can help impart to them by playing a real game at the level you hope someday they will achieve.


As soon as kids start playing in tournaments they hear about “ratings” or how players are assigned a number which shows their relative skill level. When registering for Tri-State Chess tournaments, you also deal with ratings even if it is just to understand that you don’t have one yet when figuring out in which section you will play.
The modern rating system is about 50 years old and was created by Arpad Elo, a physics professor who had a passion for chess. Elo’s system known as ELO rating, is based around the simple idea that two players with the same rating that play many games will each win ideally half the time or 50% of those games that are not draws.
When players ratings differ this 50% win rate changes and in the US, when the better player wins ~91% of the time the rating change is set at 400 points. For example, a player rated at 1100 should win 91% of his games with a player rated at 700.



For regular chess tournaments [not Blitz or Mail (correspondence) chess], the US Chess Federation calculates two types of ratings, “provisional” for a players first 25 games, and after 25 games “established” ratings. As most of our players have questions on their initial ratings and 25 games covers six tournaments (four games/tournament), we will focus on the detail for “provisional” ratings.

Provisional ratings are fairly simple in that the number 400 plays a central role and the rating of the person you play is key. For the next 25 games, if you win, your interim rating becomes the rating of the other player plus 400 points, if you lose your interim rating becomes the rating of the other person minus 400 points. If you get a draw your interim rating becomes the same as the person with whom you had a draw. Interim ratings are then averaged to come up with your provisional rating. The table below shows an example from a pretend new player’s (Derrick Zwetchkenstein’s) 1st tournament at PS9 on April 10th. —-CONTINUED ON PAGE 7—-


-5-



-6-






Chess Ratings
(Continued from the page 5)


After a player competes 25 games in tournaments they receive an “Established” rating. This is then adjusted in a more complicated way, using a player’s score each round (1=win, 0=loss, ½=draw). We will look at how
Established ratings are calculated in the next issued of The Chess Exchange newsletter.
Ratings in chess range from about 100 for real beginners up to 2500-2800 for the most advanced players. Higher level players are also awarded titles by FIDE the international chess association. Players with a 2500 rating for instance, are eligible to apply for the Grandmaster title which also involves playing successfully in special tournaments with other grandmasters (norms).
Gary Kasparov the former world champion still holds many records connected to his former rating including:

  • In January 1990 Kasparov achieving the (then) highest FIDE rating ever, passing 2800 and breaking Bobby Fischer’s old record of 2785.
  • On the July 1999 and January 2000 FIDE rating lists Kasparov reached a 2851 Elo rating, the highest rating ever achieved.
  • There was a time in the early 90s when Kasparov was over 2800 and the only person in the 2700s was Anatoly Karpov.
  • According to the unofficial Chessmetrics calculations, Kasparov was the highest rated player in the world continuously from February 1985 until October 2004.
  • He also holds the highest all-time average rating over a 2 (2877) to 20 (2856) year period and is second to only Bobby Fischer’s (2881 vs 2879) over a one-year period.

Though players closer to Kasparov’s remarkable chess ratings records and at the highest levels of chess often think about their rating and those of their colleagues, it is better for beginners to not worry too much about their rating. New players especially who will receive a provisional ratings for some time, should focus instead on getting used to other aspects of tournament play. It is far more important to learn how to do your best in the excitement and competition of a tournament setting both to win the right way and when it happens, how to lose or handle losses







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-8-



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bordercolor= #88d9ff
CELLSPACING=1
CELLPADDING=7
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align=”center”>


PS 116
January 17, 2011
137 Players

K-1
LUKE PHILIPS 4.0

Primary
MOSES WEINTRAUB 4.0
MEYER LEVINSON-BLOUNT 4.0

Reserve
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0
ADIEN MCGORRY 4.0

Classic
SAM POZNER 3.5
CURTIS MOTULSKY 3.5

Open
KAI KRONBER 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 3.0/>



Park East Chess Championship I
February 13, 2011
127 Players

Beginner
JESSICA RATTRAY 4.0

Novice
ELAN SHETREAT-KLEIN 4.0
DARNELL SMITH 4.0
CHARLES FINE 4.0

Reserve
CARL TRISCARI 4.0
MEIR BRODER-SCHULSINGER 4.0

Primary
BENJAMIN COLE 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM 4.0



Hunter
April 3, 2011
154 Players

Future Masters
LIAM GLASS 3.0
BRANDON HUANG 3.0

Championship
TARASN IDNANI 4.0

Reserve
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0

CHRISTIAN CHANDY 4.0

Booster
THIBAULT VIGNON 4.0

Primary
HANNAH GILBERT 4.0
CAROL CHEN 4.0


PS 6
January 23, 2011
95 Players

Under 600
DANIEL JINLIN YIN 4.0
SACHA SLOAN 4.0

Under 1000
DIVIJ JAIN 4.0
THEO GEORGE KOGAN 4.0

Open 1
JONATHAN ZANG 3.0
ANTOINE LEONELLI 3.0
ERIC ZHANG 3.0

Open 2
OMNI BERGNER-PHILLIPS

Open 3
MAXWELL BEEM 2.5
JANE ZHANG


PS 116
February 20, 2011
100 Players

K-1
JESSICA RATRAY 4.0

Primary
QIAN ZHOU 4.0

Reserve
ZACHARY MORRIS 4.0

Classic
MAX SELENDRY 4.0

Open
DANIEL MINTZ 3.5
JEFFERY RODRIGUEZ JR 3.5

Championship
KASSA KORLEY 3.0


PS 9 Chess Championship III
April 10, 2011
157 Players

Beginner
MARK APTERMAN 4.0
ALEXI FANE-SCHLENKER 4.0

Novice
GRANT CAILE 4.0
DANIEL KLONER 4.0
TIMOTHY BREDTT 4.0
NIKHIL DENATALE 4.0

Reserve
OTTAVIO PASQUINI 4.0

Primary
NOAH FAWER 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM\ 4.0


SAR Academy Chess Championship VII

January 23, 2011
105 Players

Beginner
ELIOT LEVIN 4.0

Novice
JACOB SCHORSCH 4.0

Reserve
JAZMINE CUELLO 4.0

Primary
DAVID YAGUDAYEV 4.0

JONATHAN KATZMAN 4.0

Championship

LEROY RIGBY 4.0
JETER CUELLO 4.0


PS 6

March 13, 2011

81 Players

Under 600

ROBERT WANG 4.0

Under 1000

ALISA CRAVEN 4.0

Open 1

LUCIAN HICKS 3.0

GABRIEL JOSEPH 3.0

JONATHAN WONG 3.0

Open 2

TRISTAN SOLLECITO 4.0

Open 3

DANIEL MINTZ 2.5

HUDSON BEAUDOIN 2.5

ARJUN GARG 2.5


PS 116

April 10, 2011

140 Players

K-1

JACK LEHMAN 4.0

Primary

MATTHEW KUE 4.0

ALEX PAIVA 4.0

Reserve

THEO MCGRATH 4.0

NICOLAS CIVANTOS 4.0

Classic

HARRIS LENCZ 3.5

THOMAS PANNETT 3.5

BRYCE DEMOPOULOS 3.5

Open

GEORGE CHACHKES 3.5

Championship

KASSA KORLEY 3.0


PS 41
February 5, 2011
18 Players

Primary
GABRIREL MARKOWITZ 4.0

Reserve
HENRY SNOWDON 4.0


PS 77
February 6, 2011
101 Players

K-1
MILES OPULAUOHO 4.0

Primary
AKIRA NAKADA 4.0

Reserve
ELLIS PINSKY 4.0
HARUKI IZUMI 4.0

Classic
EVAN KAUFFMANN 3.5

Open
FLORIZELLE SONGCO 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 2.5
KASSA KORLEY 2.5



Rodeph Sholom
Chess Championship IV
March 13, 2011
134 Players

Beginner
BENJAMIN MEDINA 4.0

Novice
WILBUR HERNANDEZ 4.0
EITAN LINHART 4.0

Reserve
MALICKE COLE 4.0

Primary
MEYER LEVINSON-BLOUNT 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM 4.0



PS 41
April 30, 2011
20 Players

Primary
HARRISON BECKLER 4.0

Reserve
GABRIEL MARKOWITZ 4.0

Hunter
February 13, 2011
154 Players

Future Masters
ALEX EISENSTEIN 3.0

Championship
HUGH CHAPIN 4.0

Reserve
NICHOLAS NEU 4.0
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0

Booster
ALEXANDER PELLITTERI 3.5

Primary
JULIA FREITAG 4.0
OLIVER RYAN KANDERS 4.0


PS116
March 20,2011
141 Players

K-1
JAY HENRY 4.0

Primary
AKIRA NAKADA 4.0
DARREN LI JUNG 4.0

Reserve
AMIR SAABNEH 4.0

Classic
BENJI WEINSTEIN 3.5
BENJAMIN YAO 3.5
SHAAN DAVE 3.5

Open
FLORIZELLE SONGCO 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 3.0



PS 6
May 1, 2011
120 Players

Under 600
GRANT CAILE 4.0

Under 1000
RYDER HENRY 4.0
WILLIAM HIRASAWADAS 4.0
WILLIAM CLARKE 4.0

Open 1
JAMIE NICOLAS 3.5
ZACHARY MORRIS 3.5

Open 2
TAKAYUKI ISHIKAWA 4.0

Open 3
JULIAN CHING WANG 2.5


PS 158 Chess Championship XIV
May 15, 2011
157 Players


Beginner
SEBASTIAN TORREY 3.5

Novice
ADAM AVNET 4.0
ARDEN YUM 4.0.

Reserve
JOSEPH FIGUEROA 4.0
OTTAVIO PASQUINI 4.0

Primary
JACK MARCUS 4.0

Championship
SHAWN COBB 4.0

Grand Prix Rules

To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess will introduce new ¡§Grand Prix¡¨ prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix” points.
At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at Tri-State¡¦s concession stands at tournaments or at the Chess Exchange store at

325 E. 88 Street between 1st and 2nd Ave. New York, NY (212) 289-5997

For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:

– 1st Place=10;   -2nd Place=6;    – 3rd Place=4;     -4th Place=2,    – 5th Place=1

If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.

For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get 6.7 points.


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Ramaz Chess Team Flexes Muscles at Nationals








BY MARK KURTZMAN


Each year, thousands of scholastic players descend upon a different location in the U.S. to compete at the National Scholastic Chess Championships. This year’s Grade School Nationals event was held at Lake Buena Vista, Florida (at Disneyworld) with 1350 students participating.
The tournament is divided by grades and produces a National Championship individual and team for each grade. Playing up into a higher grade is not allowed. Teams of at least 3 players from the same school must be in the same grade to create a team.
The Ramaz Chess Team has a great history of competing successfully at Nationals. This year was no exception. The 7th grade team from Ramaz captured the 2nd place team honors in the USA, by scoring brutal victories over some very powerful opponents.
—- Continued on page 3 —-











Staunton and the Elgin Marbles:


How a Famous Ancient Greek Sculpture Became the Model for the Knight

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Imagine if you were playing in a tournament and your opponent sits down, takes out a bag of pieces and says “let’s use my set”. You look at the pieces and you can’t tell the difference between
the queen, a bishop or a pawn. When you ask your partner for help and set up the pieces the king is so skinny it keeps falling over. This might have happened 200 years ago before chess pieces had the same design.

—- Continued on page 3 —-




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“Why Can’t He Let Me Win?”:



Why Chess Teachers and Parents Should Always Do Their Best

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Beginners see it getting in the way of the game every tournament.
Some kids who just learned what chess notation is a few weeks ago are so involved with writing down and recording their game that they don’t mind so much if they lose!
Chess notation or the system for recording your game should help you as a tool and not become so difficult that you spend energy and focus on writing your moves rather than planning to checkmate your opponent and win.
Chess notation is optional in the Beginner and Novice sections at our tournaments, but is mandatory in all other sections.



Notation often helps immediately with questions or issues players might have with the game.
At a recent tournament at P.S. 9 in December, tournament directors noticed many students in the beginner section raising their hands with questions about the accuracy of their opponent’s moves. In several cases the notation,
usually from the student not raising the issue, showed precisely what had occurred and was evidence for how players moved, eliminating any argument!
—– Continued on page 5 —-


Chess Notation at Tournaments: How to Make Notation Your Friend
and not your Enemy BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

Beginners see it getting in the way of the game every tournament. Some kids who just learned what chess notation is a few weeks ago are so involved with writing down and recording their game that they don’t mind so much if they lose!
Chess notation or the system for recording your game should help you as a tool and not become so difficult that you spend energy and focus on writing your moves rather than planning to checkmate your opponent and win.



Chess notation is optional in the Beginner and Novice sections at our tournaments, but is mandatory in all other sections.
Notation often helps immediately with questions or issues players might have with the game. At a recent tournament at P.S. 9 in December, tournament directors noticed many students in the beginner section raising their hands with questions about the accuracy of their opponent’s moves. In several cases the notation, usually from the student not raising the issue, showed precisely what had occurred and was evidence for how players moved, eliminating any argument!

—- Continued on page 5 —-



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Ramaz Chess Team Triumphs (Continued from the front page)


Team Superstar, Jacob Berman, who has continuously led his team to victory, came through once again with a staggering 5.5 out of 7 points. Berman, whose only loss was to an Expert rated player in round 3, improved his rating to 1852. As of December 2010, Jacob Berman is ranked 28th in the country for players aged 11 and under, rated at 1807!

Of course it is not enough to have one great player to win as a team at Nationals. The team has 3 other players who have consistently played well and scored upsets over higher rated players. Sarah Ascherman is one of them, scoring 4.5 out of 7 and achieving a draw in round 4 against a player rated 1902! In addition, Alex Eisenstein got his rating back over 1500 by beating a 1758 in round 4 and finishing with 4 points. Alex has finished in the top 25 of his grade at the Nationals numerous times in the past! Matthew Levy, the final member of the winning Ramaz Team also finished strong with 4 points, including 2 victories over players rated in the high 15 and 1600’s. After the tournament, Levy, Ascherman and Eisenstein had all raised their ratings to go above 1500. Joshua Berman and Daniel Levy also represented Ramaz with excellent results, but not in the same grade.
Two years ago when this same team competed in the 5th Grade Nationals, they tied for 1st place and earned the title of US Co-Champions for 5th grade in 2008! Congratulations to the Ramaz Chess Team!!

Staunton and the Parthenon Marbles Continued from the front page)
In 1849, John Jaques and his brother in law Nathaniel Cook of the games company John Jaques of London, realized this problem of different chess sets and decided to come up with a new chess set. They used a style based on the art and buildings of Ancient Greece that was very fashionable at the time.
Fifty years earlier Thomas Bruce,”The Lord of Elgin” who was England’s ambassador to Turkey, decided to draw the magnificent sculpture built around the top of the Parthenon, the greatest remaining building of the Ancient Greeks located in Athens, the capital city. Greece at the time was under Turkey’s rule so he had no problem getting access to the building. But he made a decision to take away the actual sculptures and bring them to England. Some people think he got permission from the Turkish government.



Jacques decided to start making and producing the new chess sets. He had Howard Staunton, a famous chess player, attach his name to the set and help sell them.
Staunton got a fee for each set sold. The design became so popular it spread around the world and the Staunton design remains the standard chess set we use at schools, tournaments, and sell at The Chess Exchange store. The argument for returning the marbles is still continuing today. Despite whether Elgin, and the British government did the right thing, what remains in your hand, every time you move Nf3 at the start of a game, are mini-sculptures of amazing detail and beauty based on some of the greatest art of the ancient world.


The “Elgin Marbles” were then in 1816 supposedly bought by the British government and placed in the British Museum where they still are today.
Many argue that the marbles should be returned to Greece.
Even in 1849 this argument was going on. Cook, meanwhile, decided to base the knight from the new set on the horses from the marbles and


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Bughouse: How to Play the Controversial Game

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

As students make progress in chess, especially at a higher level, they begin to experiment with pieces on the board and often ask if they can play with 4 queens in a different starting arrangement or with two full sets on a larger board. These changes to the standard game are called chess variants. “Bughouse” is by far the most popular variant and often, especially in a club atmosphere, more advanced kids when they hear the slangy name and learn how it is played, will soon ask their instructor “Hey, can we play bughouse?” Bughouse is played by an even number of players, with the most popular version involving 4 players and two boards. The boards are set up side by side with one player of the first team using the black pieces and the other member of the team with white pieces, sitting next to his teammate.

During the game, the rules of chess apply but when a piece is captured it is passed to the team member next to you. Captured pieces are then either held in reserve or placed on the board of your team member. Placing a piece costs the player one move and pieces can be placed so they check the king or attack another piece. The game is over when checkmate is delivered on one board. Other modifications to standard rules are that pawns cannot be placed on the first or last rank, that promoted pawns can revert back to pawns when captured, and pieces can be placed where they deliver check or checkmate. Also, bughouse is usually played with clocks. Students love bughouse because of its catchy name, fast pace, and radically different rules that seem to go against some of the established rules of chess. But some chess educators are against allowing students to play the game because they feel it leads to bad habits and can destroy some of the intuitive ways chess players see the board. After playing lots of bughouse, players often forget that in regular chess, when they sacrifice, there isn’t anyone to feed them more pieces for their attack. A less severe approach that recognizes more gray than “black and white” might be to only allow the strongest clubs or classes to play and to offer it as a type of reward if students do exceptionally well in class/club. As long as it isn’t played too often , as with many things, having a balanced amount of
bughouse play in class or club, can be very fun for kids and lead to more interest in the game overall.


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Why Parents & Teachers Should not let you Win


(Continued from page 2)


Even more than winning, how to lose is critical for kids to learn. How to learn from mistakes is a lifelong lesson we can help impart to them by playing a real game at the level you hope someday they will achieve.





It is also dishonest to fake losing in a serious way.
Kids can be misled into thinking chess is so easy because they beat their dad right away and he has a 2200 level rating. Chess like most rewarding activities takes years of hard work but pays off big providing an unusual mix of fun and learning for the rest of your life. Often I ask students in front of their parents “Oh do you play with Mom,” they often answer “Yes, but I never win,” -sometimes in a wavering, sad voice. “Well” we can answer, ‘”you don’t win NOW but you will eventually win against Mom and maybe beat me too!”
So keep in mind that though we want our kids to win, they want to win even more and can shy away from things when they lose. How to learn from losing and to push on despite losing and say “Lets play again”, to stay determined in the face of adversity are very important ideas for kids to learn right away. By being honest with ourselves and our children we can better prepare them for a truthful and successful life.

Chess Notation
(Continued from page 2)


Most importantly, notation can help you to figure out your mistakes and those of your opponent by reviewing the game afterwards with your coach or a higher level player.
As Garry Kasparov recently said, the only difference between him and other high level players is that he made fewer mistakes than those he played. For close to 20 years he was able to work especially hard to figure out his mistakes and then use that to correct his flaws. According to Kasparov and all high level players, “every game has mistakes!”
So practice notation in the safe setting of chess class or club first, till you are good enough to not have it take away from your game. Then, when a tournament comes around, you can also notate in a relaxed way, in the background of the game without


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HUNTER TOURNAMENT

November 7, 2010

120 Players

FM
JONATHAN BACCAY 2.5

KAI KRONBERG 2.5

CHAMPIONSHIP

LIAM S FLANAGAN 4.0

RESERVE

DYLAN NAGEL 4.0

BOOSTER

CHRISTIAN CHANDY 4.0

PRIMARY

BRAM ELLANT 4.0

PHILIP HOOVER II 4

PS 77 TOURNAMENT

November 15, 2010

97 Players


CHAMPIONSHIP

RAVEN M STURT 3.0

OPEN

ETHAN S JOO 4.0

CLASSIC

WILLIAM CHIN 4.0

RESERVE

AUGGIE BHAVSAR 3.5

SAMUEL PADWA 3.5

DYLAN ZHANG 3.5

PRIMARY

PHILIP HOOVER II 3.5

AKIRA NAKADA 3.5

K-1

COLIN MANDL-CIOLEK 3.5

CAROL CHEN 3.5

COLUMBIA GRAMMAR

FRI TOURNAMENTS

November 19, 2010

116 Players


PREMIER

ROBERT FRANTS 3.0

CLASSIC

NOAH HARRISON RUBINSTEIN 4.0

RESERVE

OWEN HIGGS 3.5

3rd GRADE

INIGO RIVERA 4.0

2ND GRADE

NICHOLAS

RUDIN 4.0

1ST GRADE

BLAKE
MARGOLIS 4.0

PS 6 TOURNAMENT

November 21, 2010

90 Players


OPEN 3

MATTHEW MIYASAKA 3.0

OPEN 2

STEFAN JELENKOVIC 3.5

OPEN 1

SHAI SLAV 3.5

K-8 U1000

RYDER HENRY 3.5

ABIGAIL LEE ZHOU 3.5

K-8 U600

AILSA RACHEL CRAVEN 4.0

QUENTIN CHEN 4.0

PS 158 CHESS

CHAMPIONSHIP XIII

November 14, 2010

154 Players


OPEN
ERICBERNE MARTINEZ 4.0
DANIEL MINTZ 4.0

PRIMARY
CHRISION WYNAAR 4.0
ARMANDO NEGRON 4.0

RESERVE
KENNETH RODRIGUEZ 4.0
DAVID GUBER 4.0
MICHAEL LEVINSON 4.0

NOVICE
CAMERON COOPER 4.0
LIAM RUST 4.0

BEGINNER
GAVRIEL GURGOV 3.5
DAVIDE MURILLO 3.5
DYLAN CHALLENGER 3.5

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HUNTER TOURNAMENT
DECEMBER 5, 2010
134 Players


FM
KIERNAN MCVAY 2.0
MAXWELL BEEM 2.0
MAX EVERETT 2.0

SARAH HUGUETTE ASCHERMAN 2.0

CHAMPIONSHIP
TRISTAN SOLLECITO 4.0

RESERVE
STEPHEN MOON 4.0

BOOSTER
AUGUST ALEXANDER 2.0
MAUDE LECHNER 2.0

PRIMARY
HARRIS LENCZ 4.0
JULIANA AVEDISIAN 4.0

QUAD 1
JULIE E FLAMMANG 3.0


Columbia Grammar
FRI TOURNAMENTS
December 17, 2010
74 Players


PREMIER
ZACHARY D MARTIN 2.0
STEPHEN MOON 2.0
NOAH HARRISON RUBINSTEIN 2.0
CLASSIC

EITAN GENGER 3.5

RESERVE
THEO GEORGE KOGAN 3.0
NATHANIEL CHIN 3.0
AARON CHIN 3.0

2ND GRADE
JASON KURSMAN 4.0

1ST GRADE
NICHOLAS DINGLE 4.0

K
JULIAN DANIELS 4.0


PS 9 CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP II
December 19, 2010
198 Players


OPEN

SEAN SOOKRAM 4.0

PRIMARY

JOHANN HATZIUS 4.0

RESERVE

BOUBACAR BALDE 4.0

MICHAEL LEVINSON 4.0

NOVICE

DANIEL JINLIN YIN 4.0

ETHAN RABI NILI 4.0

SHUBH KHANNA 4.0

BEGINNER

RONALD PAUL ARVEY 4.0

MAX RABIN 4.0


PS 116 TOURNAMENT
December 19, 2010
93 Players


CHAMPIONSHIP
RAVEN M STURT 3.0
ALEX SPINNELL 3.0

OPEN
MATTHEW MIYASAKA 4.0

CLASSIC
ALISA KIKUCHI 3.5

RESERVE
NATHANIEL KUE 3.5
THOMAS PANNETT 3.5
BENJAMIN YAO 3.5

PRIMARY
WYATT COLBURN 4.0
CHRISTOPER C VINCENT 4.0

K-1
AARISH IDNANI 3.5


HUNTER TOURNAMENT
JANUARY 9, 2011
114 Players


QUAD 1
DMITRY LEVKOV 2.5

CHAMPIONSHIP
GEORGE DAVIDSON CHACHKES 4.0

RESERVE
INKO BOVENZI 4.0

BOOSTER
COURTNEY L DENNISTON 4.0

PRIMARY
JAMES Y LEE 4.0
GIL SONDHEIMER 4.0

QUAD 2
BRANDON HUANG 2.0
MAX EVERETT 2.0

QUAD 3
DANNY JIN 2.5


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Queens vs. Kings: Why Women Chessplayers Should Have Equality With Men
BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Last month in St. Louis, Gata Kamsky the second highest rated US player (2808), won the 2011 US Championship title and a $42,000 prize. At the same location, Anna Zatonskih the highest rated woman (2506), won the Women’s US Championship and an $18,000 prize.
If chess is a game where you mostly think and doesn’t use the body’s muscles like other sports, why are the highest rated women often rated 200-300 points lower, and get less money in prizes? In scholastic chess, such as at Tri-State Chess tournaments, girls and boys are equal.
—-CONTINUED ON PAGE 3—-


Chess and the Founding Fathers: Franklin & Jefferson’s Passion
for the Game

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


At the beginning of the summer we will celebrate a special birthday. It is not the birthday of your friend or relative. On July 4th, 2011 our country the United States of America will be 235 years old. Two hundred thirty five years ago, the leaders of our new country signed a very famous paper, the Declaration of Independence.
Many of these “Founding Fathers” played chess including the most famous signer Benjamin Franklin, and the man who wrote the Declaration, Thomas Jefferson.










Benjamin Franklin was an unusual man who was interested in many different subjects and was successful in almost everything he tried. He was a printer, publisher, businessman, politician, and a scientist who flew a kite in a famous experiment to prove lightning is electricity.

—-CONTINUED ON PAGE. 3—-


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To Queenside Castle or not to Queenside Castle?

That is the Question

BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT

When kids first learn about castling they often are still weak overall players without too much experience. They are often told to castle as soon as possible and on the side of the King or to castle Kingside or “SHORT”. While a majority of the time this is sound advice for beginners, for players who either have played a few tournaments or are comfortable with all the pieces and basic rules an strategies of chess, when and how to castle can be very important and involves sometimes castling “LONG” or Queenside.


Overall, queenside castling can be risky as it puts the King closer to the center of the board. This risk must be looked at when thinking of the more special cases when queenside castling can work out.


There are three basic reasons or board situations when you might want to castle queenside:


KINGSIDE CASTLING IS NO LONGER AN OPTION

Castling is an important move that can give one an instant defensive advantage. However there are times when you are prohibited from castling on one side of the board. If you move your king you cannot castle on either side. However if you move a rook, you cannot castle on the side that the rook is on. If you had to move your kingside rook you can only castle queenside. You also cannot castle into check, out of check, or through a check. If you have any of these situations on the kingside of the board you can probably only castle queenside.


POSITIONING YOUR ROOK

Though Queenside castling is often harder (You must take out another piece (the queen) to clear the way between the King and the Rook), its final position leaves the rook with whom you castled without any pieces in front of it, which can be a strong attacking position. As shown on the right, this can result sometimes in the rook controlling the whole “d” file. If this strengthens your position, you should castle queenside.
– —-CONTINUED ON PAGE 4 —–




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Chess and the Founding Fathers (Continued from the front page)


Franklin also enjoyed playing chess and even wrote a short essay called “The Morals of Chess.” Franklin was famous for his practical ideas for how to live and for creating expressions such as “Early to bed, early to rise keeps a man healthy wealthy and wise.” In his chess essay, he delivered similar advice stressing the idea of doing to others (on the chessboard) what you ideally wish them to do for you. He mentions how chess players learn to be careful and use caution and think positively, He warns about being unfair and even specifically tells players how “you shouldn’t sing nor whistle . . nor make a tapping with your feet on the floor . . to bother the other player while he
is thinking.”


Franklin’s friend and one of his most challenging chessboard rivals was Thomas Jefferson, who wrote the Declaration of Independence and later on became the third US president. Jefferson loved to play chess and owned several books on chess. Recently, at Jefferson’s home Monticello, which he designed and built, archeologists poking through Jefferson’s garbage found two small round balls, each about the size of two marbles.
Jefferson’s House (Monticello) Designed by him!At first they had no idea what they were.
However, one of the archeologists must have been a chess player when she shouted excitedly “Egads, Eureka, those are the tops of pawns.” Given Jefferson’s great sense of humor, Jefferson might have even




broken off the heads of the pawns in front of his opponent or the person with whom he was playing. It is easy to picture him saying to an opponent like Franklin “now that we played a standard game, let’s take away a few pawns to make it more fun!

Queens vs. Kings (Continued from the front page)

But even at our tournaments, parents and kids too tend to look at chess as a game for boys. In families where brothers and sisters play it is rare where the sister will be the better player. Her brothers often will receive most of the parents’ support, especially for becoming a higher level player and even for starting out as a beginner.

The real reason for there being so few women Grandmasters can be traced back to when kids first start to play. In a famous 1986 study of why there are so few women at the top of the chess world, Chabris and Glickman show that the answer is in the numbers; boys are starting out at chess in much greater numbers.

Though top woman players like Susan Polgar are trying to reverse this trend encouraging more girls to start out with chess through special all girls teams and events, there are similar cultural forces that keep women on a separate track as they get older.

Women’s Chess at its highest level is still dominated by players from countries from the former soviet union like, Russia, Armenia, and Azerbaijan. The current US Champion for example is Anna Zatonskih (born and raised in the Ukraine) who just won her fourth US Champion Title two weeks ago in a match against Tatev Abrahamyan (born and raised in Armenia.).

Though these and other top women players now live in the US, their country of origin is very important. Culturally, the countries of the former Soviet Union have more traditional views of men and women.

—CONTINUED ON PAGE 4—


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Queenside Castling (Continued from the page 2)



STORMING PAWNS

If your opponent castles first Kingside, you might want to castle queenside so you can use your pawns to attack your opponent’s king without weakening your own castle. If you plan to use pawns to attack, castling on the same side as your opponent can be costly as you must convert your pawns from a defensive role to offensive soldiers.


The diagram on the right shows a good example from the 1925 game between Alekhine and Marshall. Here Alekhine’s earlier queenside castle (move 15) allows him great flexibility in attacking (Storming) Marshall’s King and castled pieces here after move 21 f6
These three basic ideas are a good beginner’s foundation for understanding the Queenside castle. Try them out, you will begin to see that sometimes the extra effort of the Queenside castle is well rewarded.







Queens vs. Kings (Continued from the page 3)

There was no feminist movement on a national scale in these countries that was like the movement in this country in the late sixties and seventies. They are therefore used to the traditional attitudes towards women that support a separation for women at chess’ professional level.


With cultural forces keeping girls from starting chess and others keeping them from being equal at the top levels, what is a good solution?


Perhaps encouraging separate girls events can help bring in greater numbers of girls to the game. However, once they climb to higher levels they should be allowed to compete equally.

By getting rid of any separate older women’s track for chess, girls would have an equal “bridge” to higher level chess where there would be equal opportunity at the highest level. We look forward someday, not too far in the future to seeing a special women chess player’s name followed by two words only: World Champion

-4-








Chess Ratings: The Inside Scoop on How USCF Provisional Ratings Are Calculated


BY DANIEL TAUBENBLAT


Even more than winning, how to lose is critical for kids to learn. How to learn from mistakes is a lifelong lesson we can help impart to them by playing a real game at the level you hope someday they will achieve.


As soon as kids start playing in tournaments they hear about “ratings” or how players are assigned a number which shows their relative skill level. When registering for Tri-State Chess tournaments, you also deal with ratings even if it is just to understand that you don’t have one yet when figuring out in which section you will play.
The modern rating system is about 50 years old and was created by Arpad Elo, a physics professor who had a passion for chess. Elo’s system known as ELO rating, is based around the simple idea that two players with the same rating that play many games will each win ideally half the time or 50% of those games that are not draws.
When players ratings differ this 50% win rate changes and in the US, when the better player wins ~91% of the time the rating change is set at 400 points. For example, a player rated at 1100 should win 91% of his games with a player rated at 700.



For regular chess tournaments [not Blitz or Mail (correspondence) chess], the US Chess Federation calculates two types of ratings, “provisional” for a players first 25 games, and after 25 games “established” ratings. As most of our players have questions on their initial ratings and 25 games covers six tournaments (four games/tournament), we will focus on the detail for “provisional” ratings.

Provisional ratings are fairly simple in that the number 400 plays a central role and the rating of the person you play is key. For the next 25 games, if you win, your interim rating becomes the rating of the other player plus 400 points, if you lose your interim rating becomes the rating of the other person minus 400 points. If you get a draw your interim rating becomes the same as the person with whom you had a draw. Interim ratings are then averaged to come up with your provisional rating. The table below shows an example from a pretend new player’s (Derrick Zwetchkenstein’s) 1st tournament at PS9 on April 10th. —-CONTINUED ON PAGE 7—-


-5-



-6-






Chess Ratings
(Continued from the page 5)


After a player competes 25 games in tournaments they receive an “Established” rating. This is then adjusted in a more complicated way, using a player’s score each round (1=win, 0=loss, ½=draw). We will look at how
Established ratings are calculated in the next issued of The Chess Exchange newsletter.
Ratings in chess range from about 100 for real beginners up to 2500-2800 for the most advanced players. Higher level players are also awarded titles by FIDE the international chess association. Players with a 2500 rating for instance, are eligible to apply for the Grandmaster title which also involves playing successfully in special tournaments with other grandmasters (norms).
Gary Kasparov the former world champion still holds many records connected to his former rating including:

  • In January 1990 Kasparov achieving the (then) highest FIDE rating ever, passing 2800 and breaking Bobby Fischer’s old record of 2785.
  • On the July 1999 and January 2000 FIDE rating lists Kasparov reached a 2851 Elo rating, the highest rating ever achieved.
  • There was a time in the early 90s when Kasparov was over 2800 and the only person in the 2700s was Anatoly Karpov.
  • According to the unofficial Chessmetrics calculations, Kasparov was the highest rated player in the world continuously from February 1985 until October 2004.
  • He also holds the highest all-time average rating over a 2 (2877) to 20 (2856) year period and is second to only Bobby Fischer’s (2881 vs 2879) over a one-year period.

Though players closer to Kasparov’s remarkable chess ratings records and at the highest levels of chess often think about their rating and those of their colleagues, it is better for beginners to not worry too much about their rating. New players especially who will receive a provisional ratings for some time, should focus instead on getting used to other aspects of tournament play. It is far more important to learn how to do your best in the excitement and competition of a tournament setting both to win the right way and when it happens, how to lose or handle losses







-7-






-8-



-9-


-10-


PS 116
January 17, 2011
137 Players

K-1
LUKE PHILIPS 4.0

Primary
MOSES WEINTRAUB 4.0
MEYER LEVINSON-BLOUNT 4.0

Reserve
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0
ADIEN MCGORRY 4.0

Classic
SAM POZNER 3.5
CURTIS MOTULSKY 3.5

Open
KAI KRONBER 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 3.0/>



Park East Chess Championship I
February 13, 2011
127 Players

Beginner
JESSICA RATTRAY 4.0

Novice
ELAN SHETREAT-KLEIN 4.0
DARNELL SMITH 4.0
CHARLES FINE 4.0

Reserve
CARL TRISCARI 4.0
MEIR BRODER-SCHULSINGER 4.0

Primary
BENJAMIN COLE 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM 4.0



Hunter
April 3, 2011
154 Players

Future Masters
LIAM GLASS 3.0
BRANDON HUANG 3.0

Championship
TARASN IDNANI 4.0

Reserve
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0

CHRISTIAN CHANDY 4.0

Booster
THIBAULT VIGNON 4.0

Primary
HANNAH GILBERT 4.0

CAROL CHEN 4.0


PS 6
January 23, 2011
95 Players

Under 600
DANIEL JINLIN YIN 4.0
SACHA SLOAN 4.0

Under 1000
DIVIJ JAIN 4.0
THEO GEORGE KOGAN 4.0

Open 1
JONATHAN ZANG 3.0
ANTOINE LEONELLI 3.0
ERIC ZHANG 3.0

Open 2
OMNI BERGNER-PHILLIPS

Open 3
MAXWELL BEEM 2.5
JANE ZHANG


PS 116
February 20, 2011
100 Players

K-1
JESSICA RATRAY 4.0

Primary
QIAN ZHOU 4.0

Reserve
ZACHARY MORRIS 4.0

Classic
MAX SELENDRY 4.0

Open
DANIEL MINTZ 3.5
JEFFERY RODRIGUEZ JR 3.5

Championship
KASSA KORLEY 3.0


PS 9 Chess Championship III
April 10, 2011
157 Players

Beginner
MARK APTERMAN 4.0
ALEXI FANE-SCHLENKER 4.0

Novice
GRANT CAILE 4.0
DANIEL KLONER 4.0
TIMOTHY BREDTT 4.0
NIKHIL DENATALE 4.0

Reserve
OTTAVIO PASQUINI 4.0

Primary
NOAH FAWER 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM\ 4.0


SAR Academy Chess Championship VII

January 23, 2011
105 Players

Beginner

ELIOT LEVIN 4.0

Novice
JACOB SCHORSCH 4.0

Reserve

JAZMINE CUELLO 4.0

Primary
DAVID YAGUDAYEV 4.0

JONATHAN KATZMAN 4.0

Championship

LEROY RIGBY 4.0
JETER CUELLO 4.0


PS 6

March 13, 2011

81 Players

Under 600

ROBERT WANG 4.0

Under 1000

ALISA CRAVEN 4.0

Open 1

LUCIAN HICKS 3.0

GABRIEL JOSEPH 3.0

JONATHAN WONG 3.0

Open 2

TRISTAN SOLLECITO 4.0

Open 3

DANIEL MINTZ 2.5

HUDSON BEAUDOIN 2.5

ARJUN GARG 2.5


PS 116

April 10, 2011

140 Players

K-1

JACK LEHMAN 4.0

Primary

MATTHEW KUE 4.0

ALEX PAIVA 4.0

Reserve

THEO MCGRATH 4.0

NICOLAS CIVANTOS 4.0

Classic

HARRIS LENCZ 3.5

THOMAS PANNETT 3.5

BRYCE DEMOPOULOS 3.5

Open

GEORGE CHACHKES 3.5

Championship

KASSA KORLEY 3.0


PS 41
February 5, 2011
18 Players

Primary
GABRIREL MARKOWITZ 4.0

Reserve
HENRY SNOWDON 4.0


PS 77
February 6, 2011
101 Players

K-1
MILES OPULAUOHO 4.0

Primary
AKIRA NAKADA 4.0

Reserve
ELLIS PINSKY 4.0
HARUKI IZUMI 4.0

Classic
EVAN KAUFFMANN 3.5

Open
FLORIZELLE SONGCO 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 2.5
KASSA KORLEY 2.5



Rodeph Sholom
Chess Championship IV
March 13, 2011
134 Players

Beginner
BENJAMIN MEDINA 4.0

Novice
WILBUR HERNANDEZ 4.0
EITAN LINHART 4.0

Reserve
MALICKE COLE 4.0

Primary
MEYER LEVINSON-BLOUNT 4.0

Championship
SEAN SOOKRAM 4.0



PS 41
April 30, 2011
20 Players

Primary
HARRISON BECKLER 4.0

Reserve
GABRIEL MARKOWITZ 4.0

Hunter
February 13, 2011
154 Players

Future Masters
ALEX EISENSTEIN 3.0

Championship
HUGH CHAPIN 4.0

Reserve
NICHOLAS NEU 4.0
JAMIE NICOLAS 4.0

Booster
ALEXANDER PELLITTERI 3.5

Primary
JULIA FREITAG 4.0
OLIVER RYAN KANDERS 4.0


PS116
March 20,2011
141 Players

K-1
EILEEN YE 4.0
JAY HENRY 4.0

Primary
AKIRA NAKADA 4.0
DARREN LI JUNG 4.0

Reserve
AMIR SAABNEH 4.0

Classic
BENJI WEINSTEIN 3.5
BENJAMIN YAO 3.5
SHAAN DAVE 3.5

Open
FLORIZELLE SONGCO 4.0

Championship
RAVEN STURT 3.0



PS 6
May 1, 2011
120 Players

Under 600
GRANT CAILE 4.0

Under 1000
RYDER HENRY 4.0
WILLIAM HIRASAWADAS 4.0
WILLIAM CLARKE 4.0

Open 1
JAMIE NICOLAS 3.5
ZACHARY MORRIS 3.5

Open 2
TAKAYUKI ISHIKAWA 4.0

Open 3
JULIAN CHING WANG 2.5


PS 158 Chess Championship XIV
May 15, 2011
157 Players

Beginner
SEBASTIAN TORREY 3.5

Novice
ADAM AVNET 4.0
ARDEN YUM 4.0.

Reserve
JOSEPH FIGUEROA 4.0
OTTAVIO PASQUINI 4.0

Primary
JACK MARCUS 4.0

Championship
SHAWN COBB 4.0

Grand Prix Rules

To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess will introduce new ¡§Grand Prix¡¨ prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix” points.
At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at Tri-State¡¦s concession stands at tournaments or at the Chess Exchange store at

325 E. 88 Street between 1st and 2nd Ave. New York, NY (212) 289-5997

For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:

– 1st Place=10;   -2nd Place=6;    – 3rd Place=4;     -4th Place=2,    – 5th Place=1

If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.

For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get 6.7 points.


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Newsletter: Vol. 1,No3 April 2010

header1 (139K)

Playing Chess Your Whole Life:

Enjoying Chess at Any Age

Chess is one of those few activities that can be learned and enjoyed at any age. It can stay with us our whole life, as a hobby to learn from and have fun with. Many of our regular
Tri-State Chess tournament players and winners have started chess at a very young age. Some are as young as 3 or 4 years old. Many of the greatest players of all time like Bobby
Fischer or Gary Kasparov were child prodigies or kids that showed an ability or talent to learn a difficult sport, game or skill, and became advanced players at a very young age. One of
the most famous chess prodigies was Sam Reshevsky who learned chess when he was 4

–(Continued on page 6)—

Tri-State Chess & Kasparov:

President of Tri-State Chess Meets former World Champion Gary Kasparov

It isn’t every day that you get to hang out with one of the greatest chess players of all time. But that’s exactly what Tri-State Chess Prez Mark
Kurtzman was doing at the The 44th Annual Greater New York Team and Individual Chess Championship two months ago. Tri-State Chess joined
forces with the Kasparov Chess Foundation to provide Kasparov’s latest books which he signed at our country’s oldest USCF rated scholastic chess
tournament held at the New Yorker Hotel.
Kasparov is not just a former world champion but is regarded by many as the greatest chess player OF ALL TIME.
Part of the reason was his exceptional rise to the top of the chess world at such a young age and his keeping of the world
championship title and highest chess ranking for so many years.

Chess players that play in United States Chess Federation and FIDE (the worldwide chess association) are rated on a scale of 0 to about
2900 with higher numbers assigned to better players.
Kasparov has had the #1 rating in the world longer than any other player

———– Continued on page 4 ————


turk (1096K)

Fischer Random Chess:

How Bobby Changed the Game to Help Beginners

THE TOTAL AMOUNT OF DIFFERENT STARTING
POSITIONS FOR FISCHER RANDOM CHESS IS 960!
The game, created by Bobby Fischer, uses a special setup where both white and black pawns are setup like a regular
game but white’s other pieces are randomly placed on rank 1 with the king placed somewhere between the rooks and
bishops are placed on opposite-colored squares. Black then imitates exactly where white’s pieces were placed
and the game begins with normal chess rules and white’s first move. A typical game setup is shown on the right in
Diagram 1. The “randomness” of setting the white pieces can be done with complex rolling of dice or with a high-end chess
clock. The clock, shown below, known as the DGT 960, is sold by Tri-State Chess at their concessions and store.
chrchil1 (207K)

LOOKOUT!

Possible Draw:
How to Avoid Stalemate When You
are Ahead in the Endgame

When you are “ahead” in a chess game, especially during a tournament, it is exciting to think you might win. But be careful! The challenge now is
to stay ahead and win the game by checkmating your opponent. Even if you work hard and come to the endgame with a queen and king and your opponent just
has a king WARNING!! the game is not over. If you are not careful, all your sweat and hard work spent creating an advantage in material could be
lost if you allow a stalemate to occur. A stalemate is a tie or a “draw,” and is usually a mistake made by the player who is just about to
win! About 20%, yes 1 out of every five beginner section games played in our tournaments end this way. How can you avoid this from happening? Simple…
make sure there is a free square for your opponents king to move to each time you complete your move. Or… you can move your pieces closer and closer to the
enemy king each time being sure to give a check in the process. If the move you play is with check, it can never be a stalemate position. This
way you can guarantee a checkmate every time and make sure your hard work pays off by winning

 


————————————Page 3

 

Chess & Celebrities:

Famous People Who Have Played Chess

p3 (371K)
Sometimes when we are playing a tough game we think only about how easy it would be for Kramnik or Kasparov or other world champions. We
study the great names of chess like Morphy, Alekhine, Lasker and Botvinnik and ask “What would Bobby Fischer do in this situation?” Yet chess
has also been played by people who are not chess pros. In fact, chess is enjoyed by many who are not great at chess at all!
It is played and enjoyed by people not famous for how they play chess but who were famous for other reasons. Many stars, celebrities, scientists, politicians
and athletes continue to become involved with chess.

On this page we put together some photos of chess players who are and were famous for other reasons. Try to match each name to a photo.
p3p2 (20K)
You will be amazed that so many famous stars, musicians, athletes, scientists, and politicians play or have played chess.
{LOOK for the Chess Players ID Challenge solutions on page 9}


————————————Page 4

chess2 (1185K)

Tri-State Chess & Kasparov

(—-Continued From Page 1—-)

and had the highest rating in the world continuously from 1986 to 2005, over a nineteen year period. In the 1999-2000 FIDE
ratings lists he achieved the highest rating ever of 2851.Born in 1963 (he is still only 47!), his father was Jewish and his
mother Armenian. Gary’s original name was Gary Weinstein butafter his father died when he was seven, he took on his mother’s
last name Kasparyan and changed it to Kasparov.He was a true chess “prodigy” or child genius, training when he
was 7 at the Young Pioneer Palace in Baku and, at 10 at MikhailBotvinnik’s chess school under the famous coach Vladimir
Makogonov. By the time he was 17 he became a Grandmaster,twice tied for first place at the USSR Chess championships and
when he was 21 became the highest rated player in the world(2710) the youngest ever to do that. At 22, he became the
youngest ever world champion after playing a famous matchm with Anatoly Karpov, also of the former USSR.
Kasparov at age 11
In 2005 after having coached Valdimir Kramnik who went on to become world champion and Magnus Carlsen, the
youngest number one ranked player, Kasparov retired from chess. Since then he has been active in Russian politics
and has been writing a series of books about great games of the past called “My Great Predecessors”. This was the
book series he was signing at the NY Team & Individual championship as he just introduced his separate volume on
Bobby Fischer.
When asked about meeting with Kasparov, Mr. Kurtzman said: ” It was very exciting being in the presence of such
an awesome chess legend! We look forward to more visits by Gary in the future…

The Fried Liver Attack


We all learn what not to do in the opening… Don’t move the f pawn… Don’t move your queen early, etc. But
what about something we can do, to start off with a quick attack? Well, there is no sure fire method of
destroying your opponent in just a few moves, but there is a highly successful attack that can be launched
early called the Fried Liver Attack! The attack is based upon sacrificing on the weak
point in black’s position (the f7 square) early on to draw the black king into the center. It can only
work against the 2 knights defense. 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 Nc6 3. Bc4 Nf6 Diagram 1 on the right the starting moves of the 2
knights defense:

—-(Continued on page 5)–


————————————Page 5

Fried Liver

(—-Continued from page 4——)

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Playing Chess Your Whole Life

(—-Continued From Page 1—-)

and came to the US to play simultaneous exhibitions (him playing many adults all at the same time).
When he was 9 he traveled across the US playing more than over 1,500 games and only lost 8 games.

Reshevsky continued to play till he passed away in 1992 at he age of 80 having played chess for 76 years!
Music and even playing an instrument also are things that one can do for a very long time. Music and chess seem to
fit together well and are often enjoyed by the same person. Maybe the best case of this combined interest is
Grandmaster Mark Taimanov who managed to make a career out of both. He has 1997 games listed in
chessgames.com from 1938-2007 and several variations are named after him including the well known Sicilian
Taimanov variation. As a piano player he is part of the Philips compilation Great Pianists of the 20th Century. He is
shown below giving a simultaneous exhibition in St. Petersberg. At age 84 he continues to play chess and the piano.
So, if you are at the ripe old age of 10 playing a high-level first grader and complaining how these young
kids are getting so good at chess, don’t forget-you have a long way to go. Play at home a game with
Mom or even better your grandfather. Chess can be enjoyed by anyone young or old

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Fischer Random Chess

(—-Continued From Page 1—-)

Another version of Fischer Random Chess involves players taking turns placing pieces on the back rank! The
board is set with pawns in their usual place (ranks 2 and 7). White then places “non-pawn” pieces one by one on
the 1st rank using their own strategy.
Black moves by dropping a piece on his 1st rank hoping to counter white’s last move.
When all moves are over and the final setup is done, the two sides have completely different setups!
Game play begins and the pieces are moved as in regular chess.
Whether you use a clock as a setup tool or not, Fischer random chess does satisfy its creator’s goal. You cannot
use the four knights, or Guioco Piano, or Ruy Lopez openings when playing this type of game. Most of the
knowledge about the openings that you might have even acquired from chess club cannot be used against your
opponent. The game is a true equalizer and strips out the advantage of opening preparation

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Tri State Chess, All Rights Reserved

 

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THE CHESS EXCHANGE
The Newsletter of NYC Scholastic Tournament Chess
Tournament Edition: Vol. 1, Number 2 January 2010
Individual Copy/Newstand Price: $3.95
Published by:
Jose Capablanca

Jose Capablanca playing a “Simul” in 1921

Blindfold Chess & Simuls:
PHow the Greatest Chess Players
Play Multiple Players and Win

When you play chess you need huge amounts
of brain power, concentration and focus.
Even the best scholastic tournament players
though, barely think compared with top
grandmasters or those chess players that are
the best in the world. At the highest level of
chess are players that can do simultaneous
exhibitions “Simuls” or play large numbers of
players all at the same time.

Imagine a room that looks like a tournament
with 100 chess sets and different players
seated and ready to play with the black pieces.

–(Continued on page 5)–

Churchill

Churchill not giving up

Churchill

Churchill shows his “V for victory”

Resignation:

Why Student Chess Players
Should Never Lose Hope

Some of the most famous people in the world who have done
great things in life were able to do them by NOT giving up.
Things that we do that we are proud of like making an
amazing picture, reading a great book, learning a new dance
or karate move, writing a terrific story, can usually only be
done if we take time and energy, have patience and don’t
throw up our hands and walk away. One of the greatest
leaders of England, Winston Churchill who your grandparents
might remember, was famous for saying:

“Never, Never, Never, Give Up”.

When we play chess the same idea is important. According to the rules of chess, one way to end a chess game is if
one side resigns or gives up. A lot of kids know this rule even though it was mostly created to save time for
advanced players. Kids playing in school classes, programs, and especially in a tournament should never use this rule and resign.

Newsletter Contents

If you act like Churchill and never give
up, there is always the chance you could
come back and win. Sometimes, you
know you can’t win but because you can
tie the game in chess, or get a draw,
players should always keep playing in
case you might get stalemated.

–(Continued on page 6)–


Page 2

The Computer’s Greatest Quest:
Man vs. Machine-Will Computers Always Win Soon?

When you can’t find someone in your family or a friend who can play chess with you, it is fun sometimes to play the
computer. Many of the computer chess games kids play on their home computer, game system or cell phone are
very advanced and have higher levels on them that can beat student players. But did you know that some of the
chess games on your Nintendo Wii, SONY PSP, Nintendo DS, or even iPhone can also beat an advanced master
level player? Computer chess has changed in the last ten years so that advanced players play computers all the time
as a way to improve and some of the simplest least expensive computer chess games can challenge even world
champion level players.

The first chess computers were called automatons and were fakes. One of the most famous self playing machines
from about 200 years ago was called “The Turk” and was a large chess table with an attached large doll that would
make moves against a player. The Turk played with great success. As it turned out, it was a trick because inside the
table was a short man who was actually making the moves.

Turk

“The TURK with its “complicated mechanism”

Well today’s computers work differently and really
use the computer’s brain to make moves. About 40
years ago a computer expert named David Levy
who was also a Grandmaster made a bet that in ten
years he could still beat any chess computer. Well
in 1978 he won his bet and beat the best computer
called Chess 4.7. But 11 years later in 1989 a
computer called Deep Thought beat him.

Over the next ten years chess computers got better
and better as universities and companies made
improvements. IBM, one of the largest computer
companies spent millions of dollars to build Deep
Blue a chess computer that could play and they
hoped would beat even the world champion.

In 1996 IBM challenged Gary Kasparov the world
champion to a match against Deep Blue. Kasparov
won the match 4-2 but the computer beat him in
the first game.

One year later, Kasparov agreed to a rematch with Deep Blue and lost 3.5-2.5! Ten years later, just three years ago
in 2006, the world champion Vladimir Kramnik’s also lost to the computer Deep Fritz with a score of 4-2.

Newsletter Credits

Today, some of the best computers with great names
like Shredder, Rybka, and Fritz, are used by world
champion level players to help them learn and improve
their game. They can also be bought by you and are
available to anybody, some for less than $100.

Computers are usually better than humans at blitz or
chess played very quickly in as little as 5
minutes/game. This is because they can analyze very
quickly. Playing very unusual strong moves is actually
not the best way to beat a chess computer. Playing
closed positions can usually help you to get a small
advantage in position which is a better way to go.

–(Continued on page 3)–


Page 3

3 years ago scientists at the University of Alberta in Canada figured out how to have a computer calculate the best
move in every situation for the game of checkers. Now we know that for checkers a computer can never lose to a
human. Even the game of Go, a very complicated Chinese strategy game using black and white stones is being
played by computers at a high level.

Even solving checkers was a huge accomplishment that took nearly 20 years and analyzing 500 billion, billion
different positions on the board. That is a big number: 500,000,000,000,000,000,000. To do the same for chess
would require looking at 1040 different positions or 10,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000.
That is a very big number. Many computer experts see that number as too big to deal with at least for the next few
years.

But chess computers can still beat the best players even if the game has not yet been completely solved. It seems
possibly only a question of time until chess is solved too. If David Levy made a different bet now that in ten years
(2020) the game of chess will not be completely solved or that a computer cannot win every time by 2020, I think
he would lose his bet.

United We Stand:
Pawn Chains, How Pawns Gain Power by Working Together

Think of a fist when you think about how to use pawns during a chess game. Fingers are individually not that
strong and can’t lift much alone. But together, they can become incredibly strong as a fist or as a hand on a karate
master able to split ten boards in half or carry the heaviest grocery bags.

Pawns are like that too and one pawn can be weak but when it acts together with others it can become very strong
and trap even a queen or give checkmate. One of the strongest ways to use pawns is to move them so they line up
with each other diagonally with each one protecting the next. This is called a pawn chain.

How to set up a Pawn Chain

At the start or opening of a game or for three pawns all in starting position (Rank 2 for White, Rank 7 for Black) a
simple pawn chain can be set up in 2 moves by having one pawn as the base and moving the pawn to the left or
right of it one square forward. Next move a simple pawn chain is created by moving a pawn on the same side as
the last one two squares forward. This links all three pawns together diagonally.

Pawn Chain

How to Break Pawn Chains

To break a pawn chain of the person you are playing, you need to attack one of the pawns in the chain with one of
your pawns and then trade those pawns. This will weaken the chain considerably so your stronger pieces can
come in and mop up the rest of the pawns.

Another thing to consider is what pieces you have that can get past the chain and if they are in a good place on the
board. Knights can go right over a pawn chain, bishops and queens can sometimes go through it and rooks
usually have the toughest time getting past it as they must go around.

–(Continued on page 4)–


Page 4

BACROT
BACROT
POLGAR

Sometimes a real game can have an extra
long pawn chain. Below is a game
between Judit Polgar and Etienne Bacrot
from 11 years ago. Polgar is the strongest
female chessplayer ever, and Bacrot was
one of the youngest ever Grandmasters
(GMs). It is White’s (Polgar) move.
Judit can take the most advanced pawn in
the chain on c2. It appears as though this
is a good move because Black’s d pawn is
pinned and if Black then chooses to
capture her rook on c2, then White can
capture Black’s rook on d8. Can you
figure out why this is losing for White?

This game is also a good example of how
points matter less than position. Here
though Black has fewer points her strong
chain allows her to win. So, try to use
pawn chains when you can. When you
think of pawns, remember what Patrick
Henry one of the famous men who helped
create our country’s first government said
“United we stand, Divided we fall.”

Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry Giving a Fiery Speech ~1775

CopyCat Chess:
What to
Do in a Tournament When A
Player Starts Copying Your
Moves

In every tournament at least during a few
games, especially in the K-1 section, a few
players raise their hands and ask for a
tournament director to come right over.
They are always playing White and say
“Hey it’s not fair. He is a copycat and is
just copying all my moves.” Sometimes
they get angry and upset when they hear
the Director’s response that it is not illegal
and the game must continue. Yes, in chess
copying is allowed but it is not good for
Black or whoever is doing the copying
because the copycat always loses.

You should be happy if your opponent is copying your moves because it means that he can never beat you! It also
is a sign that your opponent is probably afraid of playing you and thinks you are a stronger player.
It can be stopped pretty quickly with bad consequences for the copier.

How do you stop copying? Well there is a very simple way.

–(Continued on page 5)–


Page 5

Copycat

Do not worry if someone is copying your moves and that is keeping the game even or in a potential draw.
Everything may seem even until that one move where your opponent will not be able to copy… and that’s when
you win. For example, check out the following copycat game:

1 e4 e5; 2 Nf3 Nf6; 3 Nxe5 Nxe4
4 Qe2 Qe7; 5 Qxe4

And as you can see if black continues to copy
with 5… Qxe5 he will lose the queen.

As soon as you check your opponent’s king then
they must stop copying you because they cannot
in the next move check you back the same way.
They must rather get out of check so a check in
almost every case will stop the copying.

So if you start a game as white and another player
who is usually at a lower level, begins to copy
your moves, do not worry. Be flattered he is
copying you and just remember it is actually good
for you!

BLINDFOLD CHESS… (– CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 –)

Where are the players who will move the white pieces? Out strolls a single person. Yes, that’s right, he or she will
be playing all of you at the same time or “simultaneously”.

How do they do it? Well, for them it’s almost like playing Blitz chess where you have to move right away. They
have to go from board to board and move almost immediately. Since Grandmasters play a lot of Blitz they are
used to it.

An even more difficult skill is playing blindfold chess, or on several boards at once (a Simul) with a blindfold on.
This must be done all from memory and using chess notation. The blindfolded player can’t see so all moves are
given to him using chess notation and he must keep track of all prior moves, current moves, all while keeping each
game separate -all in his brain. Truly an amazing feat.

Many famous chess players became even bigger celebrities when they did simuls and even Blindfold Chess.
Capablanca, the star Cuban world champion from 1921-1927, became famous for giving Simuls at a young age.
He went on a special tour of the United States in 1909 visiting 27 cities when he was 21 and played a total of 602
games and won 96.4% or 580 of them.

Geoge Koltanowski who died 12 years ago at the age of 96, was an expert in simuls and blindfold chess. He still
holds the record of playing 56 games blindfolded in 1960. Not only was he allowed only 10 sec/move, but he had
no losses and was able to win 50 and draw 6 of the games. So remember, the next time you beat someone in a
creative game and say to yourself, “I am soooooo good at chess. I am amazing.” Don’t forget there are always
higher levels to learn and practice.. . like blindfold chess. Hey, at least in your game you played only one person
and could see the board.


Page 6

RESIGNATION… NEVER GIVE UP (– CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 –)

In fact, about 30% of K-1 beginner players will stalemate their opponents when trying to give checkmate at the
end of the game.

Sometimes, players who are losing but never give up thought they were going to lose, but get a draw because of
the fifty move rule. This happens in the endgame if after 50 moves by the weaker side, there have been no
captures and no pawn moves. It usually takes place when all pawns are captured or stuck and it is tough or
impossible to have a checkmate. For example, if all that remains is White having a king, knight, and bishop and
Black having only a King, it is possible for White to force a checkmate but is very difficult to do. If White is
trying to checkmate Black in this situation, but can’t do it, after 50 moves it is a draw or tie game.

Now if Black had resigned or given up, as soon as he was left with only a king, he would never have gotten a
draw (worth 0.5 points in a tournament), and instead would get zero points and lose the game. Because
checkmate with a Knight and a Bishop is so difficult to force, it would be a big mistake for Black to resign here.

Besides, players come back all the time from losing positions, or being way behind in material. All it takes is one
blunder by your opponent and you are back in the game. This happens all the time even in tournaments, so
remember nobody ever won a game by resigning. Stick it out in chess and life and good things will happen!

Puzzles
Puzzle Solutions


Page 7

THE CHESS EXCHANGE PUZZLERS (Solutions in the next issue!)

White to Move: Mate in One
Puzzle
White to Move: Mate in One
Puzzle
White to Move: Mate in Two
Puzzle
White to Move: Mate in Two
Puzzle
Coupon

Page 8

Puzzle Puzzle
Classifieds

Page 9

Tournaments Results

Columbia Grammar

November 20, 2009
116 Players

Fischer Section
1 | LILIA MEILAN POTEAT 3.0
Carlsen Section
1 | ROBERT FRANTS 2.0
2 | MAX EBERSTADT-BEATTIE 2.0
Premier Section
1 | JOSHUA VERBITSKY 3.0
Classic Section
1 | JEREMY SPIERA 3.5
Reserve Section
1 | THOMAS BENSON 4.0
3rd Grade
1 | JESSE GOODMAN 3.5
2nd Grade
1 | ADAM CROMAN 4.0
1st Grade
1 | WILLIAM JAMES KNOFF 4.0
2 | HUDSON BEAUDOIN 3.5
3 | ADAM PERLSTEIN 3.5
Kindergarten
1 | BRETT GOODMAN 4.0

Hunter

November, 15, 2009
101 Players

Future Masters
1 | JULIE E FLAMMANG 3.0
2 | MATTHEW ZAFRA 2.5
3 | LEV WOLFE GORDON 2.5
Championship
1 | DANIEL ZLOTCHEVSKY 4.0
2 | MARCUS MING MIYASAKA 3.5
Reserve
1 | ALEXIA JING WEI GILIOLI 4.0
Primary
1 | HUNTER ARIANA KORN 4.0
2 | EITAN GENGER 3.5
Booster
1 | SAMUEL BENJAMIN BROCHIN 3.5

PS116

December 20th, 2009
86 players

K-1
1 | AUGGIE BHAVSAR 4.0
Primary
1 | HUDSON BEAUDOIN 4.0
Reserve
1 | GABRIEL JOSEPH 4.0
Classic
1 | ANDREW CONKEY 4.0
Open
1 | MARCUS MING MIYASAKA 3.5
2 | MATTHEW ZAFRA 3.0
3 | ISAAC VEYTSMAN 3.0
Championship
1 | RAVEN M STURT 2.5

Columbia Grammar

December 18th, 2007
97 Players

Korchnoi Section
1 | ROBERT FRANTS 2.5
Carlsen Section  
1 | MATTHEW HERTZ 3.0
Premiere Section  
1 | PETER MASON 3.0
Classic Section  
1 | MICHAEL MORIN 4.0
Reserve Section  
1 | JAYRENE SHAW 4.0
3rd Grade  
1 | SAMSON WIENER 3.0
2 | JEREMY KOGAN 3.0
3 | JASON LEVINE 3.0
2nd Grade  
1 | EITAN GENGER 4.0
1st Grade  
1 | PHILIP HOOVER 4.0
Kindergarten  
1 | BEN KANTOR 3.0
2 | THEO KOGAN 3.0

Hunter

January 10, 2010
119 Players

Future Masters
1 | LIAM GLASS 3.0
2 | JONATHAN BACCAY 2.5
3 | DANIEL HAYON 2.5
Championship  
1 | TYLER KIM 3.5
2 | NICHOLAS ALEX VUCELIC 3.5
3 | LEON LAI 3.5
Reserve  
1 | JONATHAN ZHANG 3.5
2 | ELENA MORGAN 3.5
Primary  
1 | HUDSON BEAUDOIN 4.0
2 | THOMAS JOHNSON 3.5
3 | ATTICUS YOUNG-CHANG LEE 3.5
4 | NKOMO B SMITH 3.5
Booster  
1 | BENJAMIN MANKOWITZ 4.0

PS158 Chess Championship XI

November 16, 2009
138 Players

Championship  
1 | JONATHAN HABERMAN 4.0
Reserve  
1 | DIANTE DAVIS 4.0
2 | VANESSA CARRASQUILLO 4.0
Primary  
1 | ANNA BELOBORODOV 3.5
2 | JAMARI LEE 3.5
3 | RODDA REIMER JOHN 3.5
Novice  
1 | PRESTON SCHOENBERG 4.0
2 | IVRI FAITELSON 4.0
Beginner  
1 | CHAI KATZ 4.0
2 | THEO SHIMINOVICH 4.0

Columbia Grammar

January 8th, 2010
12 Players

Carlsen Section  
1 | MAX EBERSTADT-BEATTIE 2.0
Premier Section  
1 | THOMAS KNOFF 2.5
2 | MICHAEL MORIN 2.5
Classic Section  
1 | DAVID MOON 3.5
Reserve Section  
1 | YUVRAJ CHOPRA 3.0
2 | OWEN HIGGS 3.0
3 | GABRIEL KLASS 3.0
4 | NOAH LINDSELL 3.0
3rd Grade  
1 | JASON SAMUEL LEVINE 4.0
2nd Grade  
1 | ALEXANDER EGOL 4.0
1st Grade  
1 | GAVRIEL GENGER 4.0
2 | NICHOLAS RUDIN 4.0
Kindergarten  
1 | SADIE EDELMAN 4.0

Hunter

December 6, 2009
125 Players

Future Masters  
1 | LIAM GLASS 2.5
2 | BENJAMIN J ALTMAN-DESOLE 2.5
3 | BRANDON HUANG 2.5
4 | MAX AEON CHUNG 2.5
Championship  
1 | KAI KRONBERG 4.0
Reserve  
1 | DYLAN PARKER NAGEL 4.0
Primary  
1 | ETHAN KWOK 4.0
2 | JONATHAN ZHANG 4.0
3 | ADAM KERN 3.5
Booster  
1 | VIKRANT BHATNAGAR 4.0

Browning

December 12, 2009
45 Players

Swiss A  
1 | BENJAMIN GROSS 4.0
Swiss B  
1 | YUVRAJ CHOPRA 4.0
2 | JIRAYUT CHANSAKUL 3.5

Browning

January 9, 2010
33 Players

Swiss A  
1 | CHRISTOPHER HAACK 3.5
Swiss B  
1 | BEN DAVIS 4.0

Lower Lab School

November 8th, 2009
56 players

Championship  
1 | KASSA KORLEY 3.0
Classic  
1 | FLORIZELLE SONGCO 4.0
Reserve  
1 | ARTHUR ELGHOUAYEL 4.0
2 | ROMY VASSILEV 3.5
Primary  
1 | KAELYN HA 4.0
K-1  
1 | KYLE MILLER 4.0

PS6

November 22, 2009
Thanksgiving Tournament
88 players

K-2 Rated  
1 | EITAN GENGER 3.5
2 | HUDSON BEAUDOIN 3.5
3-8 Rated  
1 | UTTKARSHNI TRIPATHII 4.0
Open 1  
1 | NICHOLAS VUCELIC 4.0
Open 2  
1 | SOPHIA ZHANG 3.5
Open 3  
1 | BEN J ALTMAN-DESOLE 3.0
Open 4  
1 | BRANDON NYDICK 2.5
2 | SOPHIA R FLANAGAN 2.5

Page 10

TRI-STATE CHESS INTRODUCES GRAND PRIX PRIZES:
Huge Bonus Certificate ($1,350 TOTAL) Prizes for Top Tournament Winners

To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess will introduce new “Grand Prix” prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix” points. At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at Tri-State’s concession stands at tournaments or at the Chess Exchange store at 288 3rd Avenue (Between Carroll and President Street) in Park Slope Brooklyn (718) 645-5896.

For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:

Section Rank (Finish) Grand Prix Points Awarded/Tournament
1st Place 10
2nd Place 6
3rd Place 4
4th Place 2
5th Place 1

If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.
For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get 6.7 points.

Top 25 Grand Prix point leaders will be listed in each newsletter. Grand Prix Point Standings can always be found online at our website. At the end of the season, the top five players with the most Grand Prix points will be presented with:

GIANT $$-CASH-$$ certificates to be used at Tri-State stores in the amounts of:

1st $500 BONUS Certificate
2nd $350 BONUS Certificate
3rd $250 BONUS Certificate
4th $150 BONUS Certificate
5th $100 BONUS Certificate

PLUS

A special personalized Grand Prix engraved plaque

Plaques and a book prize of the players choice also will be awarded for 6th -1Oth place finishers

These awards will be presented at the first 2010-11 tournament

So if you are finishing in the top 5 of your section keep track of those Grand Prix points. They add up quickly and might become serious cash to get you some great chess stuff at the end of the season!!


Page 11

Grand Prix Results

PLACE NAME(S) GRAND PRIX POINTS
1st Haberman, Jonathan 10.00
     
2nd-7th Shiminovich, Theo 8.00
  Katz, Chai 8.00
  Schoenberg, Preston 8.00
  Faitelson, Ivri 8.00
  Davis, Diante 8.00
  Carrasquillo, Vanessa 8.00
     
8th-10th Beloborodova, Anna 6.67
  John, Rodda 6.67
  Lee, Jamari 6.67
     
11th-13th Wang, Ned 4.00
  Abrons, Matthew 4.00
  Bhatnagar, Vikrant 4.00
     
14th-18th Krieger, Harrison 1.40
  Henderson, Declan 1.40
  Benenati, Santo 1.40
  Eichmann, Kayla 1.40
  Chen, Quentin 1.40
     
19th-30th Cohen, Ezra 1.17
  Agus, Elan Justin 1.17
  Agarwal, Rohan 1.17
  Finkelstein, Jesse 1.17
  Dahi, Daria 1.17
  Kohn, Max 1.17
  Maldanado, Johenny 1.17
  Morales, Kevin 1.17
  Paniagua, Miguel 1.17
  Miller, Alexander 1.17
  Haimowitz, Nathan 1.17
  Williams, Reyd 1.17
Upcoming Tournaments


Page 12

Scholastic Chess
Majestic Trophies

THE CHESS EXCHANGE
The Newsletter of NYC Scholastic Tournament Chess
First Edition: Volume 1, Number 1, November 2009
Individual Copy Newstand Price – $1.28
Published by:

HOW TO LOSE A TOURNAMENT GAME:
Players Who Know How to Lose,
Know How to Win

How you lose after a game can be more important than how you win. It is easy after you win, especially in a tournament. You are happy and excited. But after you lose it can be difficult. Some players get very upset and frustrated and sometimes cry or get angry at the kid that beat them.

We All Lose

It is important to know and think after losing that all players lose and that it is part of becoming a better player and improving. All good players, from your Dad/Mom or a friend that is really good at chess, have lost many, many times. Even the greatest players of all time like Gary Kasparov, make mistakes and lose.

Kasparov

Gary Kasparov, one of the greatest players of the last 50 years, makes a careless mistake – a “BLUNDER” (See www.tristatechess.com “videos” for actual clip of Kasparov’s blunder)

Be Kind to the Other Player After Winning

There is always one student who after winning a game, thinks he is a pro football player scoring a touchdown and yells out at the top of his lungs-” Whoo Hoo-Yeah Baby-Wow I crushed him so easily, That was the easiest
game I ever played or ever will play for the rest of my life. YeeHaw.”

— Continued on page 4 —

RUSSIAN ROOKS:
Why Players from Russia are so Good at Chess

Vladimir, Anatoly, Boris, Mikhail, these are some of the first names of some of the greatest chess champions. What do they have in common? They are obviously all “Russian” sounding as 8 of the last 10 world champions going back over the last 60 years, were from Russia. Why is this? Why are the “Russians” so good at chess?

Mikhail Tal
World Champion 1960-1961

— Continued on page 3 —


Page 2

THE THREE MINUTE TOURNAMENT ROUND:
Scholar’s Mate at Tournaments

Have you ever been to a tournament where round 1 begins and then after a few minutes the game next to you and a few other games are over and the players are done with the round? How can they be done so fast?

Usually these games are over because of “Scholar’s Mate” or a type of checkmate that is possible in only 4 moves. White brings out the queen early and attacks Black’s pawn in front of its bishop on the kingside (f7)a weak pawn only defended by Black’s king. White then brings out their bishop and also focuses it on f7. In only four moves White then takes the f7 pawn and since it is protected and the king has no way to escape so early in the game, it is checkmate as shown in the diagram below.

Don’t worry if you are Black. Scholar’s Mate can only happen if Black makes mistakes and/or doesn’t 8 protect itself. It’s actually easy to stop this “instant checkmate”. After playing Nc6, Black can attack 7 the queen on h5 BY MOVING ITS PAWN IN FRONT OF ITS KNIGHT (g7) ahead one square. The attacked queen must retreat back to f3 where it again attacks f7 and threatens checkmate. But seriously, DON’T WORRY.

You can then as Black, develop your knight on g8 4 and move it out to f6. You have then completely blocked this tricky mate and the game continues. Since White has been trying to deliver checkmate, White’s position is not so great and Black can try to use their small advantage by playing Nd4 at some point.

How do you know when someone is trying to trick you with “Scholar’s Mate?” As soon as you see a bcdef g h White’s queen out so early your alarm bells should go off and your chess antennas should go up. Bringing out your queen so early is usually not such a good idea.

In general, you want to keep your queen in its
starting position until you figure out a plan and after you have developed your important pawns, knights, and bishops.

As Black, Scholar’s Mate can cause you to lose too quickly. But knowing about it and then making a few defensive moves will stop it and keep your game alive. Scholar’s Mate is a neat
trick but you can avoid it easily. Make your game a good one that lasts longer. BUT WATCH OUT FOR SCHOLAR’S MATE.


Page 3

TIMING STRATEGIES:
A Beginner’s Guide to Using Clocks at tournaments

Click, Clack, Thack, Splat. The tournament has started and it is very quiet except for those strange sounds. Oh-these are chess clocks being hit and used by some players.

In tournaments for grown-ups, chess clocks are always used. In our tournaments and many NYC tournaments they are optional if both players agree. So you have a choice whether to use them or not. If your opponent brings out a chess clock you have to use it. But if you both decide to use it and you are new to using a clock, how do you do it? Here are some tips for beginners:

(1) Where does it go?
Since White moves first Black chooses on which side he/she wants the clock.

(2) Setting the Time
For Tri-State Chess and most NYC scholastic tournaments each round is “G/30” and clocks must be set for 30 minutes for each player. Most digital clocks are set by hitting the adjust button for each side and then using arrow control buttons to move the minute digits. A final set button usually locks the time in place.

(3) Using It: Hitting the Clock
One way to start the game with clocks is to have Black hit the clock first without moving. White then thinks as his time starts counting down. When he is ready he makes the first move of the game and then hits the clock. Black’s time now starts running down and he makes his move and then hits the clock. This continues. Both players need to keep their hands away from the clock while they play, and the clock buttons should be touched and pressed gently.

(4) Clock Strategy
With a clock there is one more way to win. If you run out of time you lose as long as the person you play has mating material or enough pieces to deliver a checkmate. When digital clocks run out of time they usually beep, or at tournaments you turn this off, and when one person runs out of time the digits usually show 0:00.
Because running out of time loses the game, at a tournament, you should not help your opponent with their half of the clock. If they do not hit their button after moving it is their fault. You will use up their time until you move!

— Continued on page 4 —

RUSSIAN ROOKS

— Continued from page 1 —

Russian Tradition
Chess is part of the history and traditions of countries from the former Soviet Union. Unlike in the USA, in Russia chess players can become very famous. In the USA most kids have heard of and can talk about football baseball or other pro sports, teams, and players. In Russia chess is so popular that kids talk about famous chess players along with their conversations about pro sports.

For most Russian kids chess is viewed more as an after-school-like enjoyable activity and has been taught for many years in a YMHA/YMCA setting. The instructors at these locations are often famous chess players themselves. One of our instructors remembers being taught at a “Y” when he was 5-6 by one of Anatoly Karpov’s (world champion 1975-1985) assistants.

In Russia, people that lived in smaller towns remember seeing family and friends playing outside on the steps of buildings. Today on the Upper Westside or in Brooklyn in an area like Park Slope, both with many beautiful buildings, you don’t really see people playing outside on the steps.

In these countries, chess is seen often as more of a sport than a game. People get excited about chess championships and tournaments. The chess writer Lev Khariton describes the 1960 world championship match between the two players Tal and Botvinnik in Moscow:

–Continued on page 4 —


Page 4

HOW TO LOSE A TOURNAMENT GAME — Continued from page 1 —

This is not how good chess players behave and it is not in the spirit of the game. You should not brag after winning instead when you win or lose try the following:

How to Win or Lose in 3 easy steps:

1) SHAKE HANDS: All players do it after a game no matter what happens

2) SAY “NICE GAME” or “THANKS FOR THE GAME”: After all many games are long and tough and
the person you play may be on your level or better than you but lost because of mistakes.

3) BE MODEST: All of us have a long way to go before becoming Kasparov or other great players. Even if your game was your best ever, don’t get too excited – there is more to learn!

RUSSIAN ROOKS

— Continued from page 3 —

“This match played in Moscow in the spring of 1960 is forever . . . in my memory. Hundreds of chess fans who couldn’t get an entrance ticket stayed outside the Pushkin Theater watching on a big demonstration board the games of the match. I will never forget the famous 6th game in which Tal . . . sacrificed a knight . . .Tal was pacing to and fro on the stage, and his famous opponent . . . confronted with a surprise sacrifice was taking all possible pains to refute Tal’s daring decision . . Botvinnik had only a few minutes left on his clock when . . . the match was moved backstage. The spectators were so excited that the atmosphere in the playing hall was like a football game!”

Family
Just like here, in Russia, many kids learn to play chess from their family, like from, their father or mother, or a grandparent. However, according one Russian teacher we spoke to, here only about 5-10% of kids learn chess this way. In Russia, the % of kids who learn and have a family member that plays chess is as high as 50-60% of all kids! This is about numbers but it is important as about 1 out of every 2 kids plays chess in Russia, but here in the USA only about 1 in 15 play. Chess in Russia is as popular with kids as soccer is here.
So if you hear Russian spoken at a tournament, or have a club with a teacher from Russia, think about why they are so good at chess. When they were kids they probably played chess all the time, inside and outside!

TIMING STRATEGIES

— Continued from page 3 —

Also, some players try to give themselves an extra buffer of time by moving very quickly at the start of the game, if they know their opponent is slower. By moving so quickly they only use a few seconds, widening the number of minutes ahead they are and adding to their buffer.

If you are planning to use a clock for the first time in a tournament, practice first with a chess teacher or relatives or friends outside the tournament. Using a clock can make a game much more exciting, as how long it takes you to play becomes an important part of the game.

If you are using a clock more often you will soon be very comfortable as it becomes second nature. Like riding a bike, you will shortly be using a clock, winning games as if you always played chess this way.

As you become a better player you will see that anyone serious about chess uses a clock. From very young students to the world champion-all of them, use clocks. You can use one TOO!!


Page 5

TRI-STATE CHESS INTRODUCES GRAND PRIX PRIZES:
Huge Bonus Certificate ($1,350 TOTAL) Prizes for Top Tournament Winners

To promote tournament chess in the New York City area, Tri-State Chess will introduce new “Grand Prix” prizes where top 5 finishers in ALL sections of Tri-State Chess tournament receive special “Grand Prix” points. At the end of the season players can turn their Grand Prix points into prizes as if they were cash at Tri-State’s concession stands at tournaments or at the Chess Exchange store at 288 3rd Avenue (Between Carroll and President Street) in Park Slope Brooklyn (718) 645-5896.

For every section of each tournament the top five finishers will get the following “Grand Prix” points:

Section Rank (Finish) Grand Prix Points Awarded/Tournament
1st Place 10
2nd Place 6
3rd Place 4
4th Place 2
5th Place 1

If players are tied in rank they will evenly split the total points for the tied finish.
For example, three players tied for first would split the total points for 1st-3rd place (20) and each would get 6.7 points.

Top 25 Grand Prix point leaders will be listed in each newsletter. Grand Prix Point Standings can always be found online at our website. At the end of the season, the top five players with the most Grand Prix points will be presented with:

GIANT $$-CASH-$$ certificates to be used at Tri-State stores in the amounts of:

1st $500 BONUS Certificate
2nd $350 BONUS Certificate
3rd $250 BONUS Certificate
4th $150 BONUS Certificate
5th $100 BONUS Certificate

PLUS

A special personalized Grand Prix engraved plaque

Plaques and a book prize of the players choice also will be awarded for 6th -1Oth place finishers

These awards will be presented at the first 2010-11 tournament

So if you are finishing in the top 5 of your section keep track of those Grand Prix points. They add up quickly and might become serious cash to get you some great chess stuff at the end of the season!!


Page 6

THE CHESS EXCHANGE PUZZLERS {Solutions in the next issue!}

MATE IN ONE: White to Move MATE IN TWO: White to Move
 

MATE IN THREE: White to Move

(from 202 Checkmates for Children. Fred Wilson and Bruce Albertson)


Page 7

THE CHESS EXCHANGE SCHOLASTIC TOURNAMENT CALENDAR

November 2009-January 2010

NOVEMBER 2009

SAT 14

Horace Mann Chess Tournaments
231 West 246th St Riverdale, NY 10471
Sophia Rohde | rohderats@aol.com | (212) 749-6200 x151

SUN 15

PS 158 CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP XI
1458 York Ave. NYC Between E 78 St & E77 St.
MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | www.TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896

Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94TH Street NYC between Park & Madison Ave
Sunil Weeramantry | www.NSCFChess.org

FRI 20

National Youth Action Championships
DoubleTree Hotel 1909 Spring Road Oak Brook, IL
www.USChess.org

Columbia Grammar & Preperatory School Friday Chess Tournaments
5 West 93rd Street NYC Between CPW and Columbus Aves.
www.kidschess.com | Sophia Rohde | rohderats@aol.com | (212) 749-6200 x151

SAT 21

National Youth Action Championships
DoubleTree Hotel 1909 Spring Road Oak Brook, IL
www.USChess.org

SUN 22

National Youth Action Championships
DoubleTree Hotel 1909 Spring Road Oak Brook, IL
www.USChess.org

PS 6 Chess Tournaments
45 E 81ST St. NYC Between Park & Madison Aves.
Michael Poukchanski | michael@chesskingdom.com

DECEMBER 2009

SUN 6

Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94TH Street NYC between Park & Madison Ave
Sunil Weeramantry | www.NSCFChess.org

FRI 11

Grade School National Championships
Hilton Anatole 2201 Stemmons Freeway Dallas, Texas
www.USChess.org

DECEMBER 2009 CONTINUED

SAT 12

Grade School National Championships
Hilton Anatole 2201 Stemmons Freeway Dallas, Texas
www.USChess.org

Browning School Chess Tournaments
52 E. 62nd Street Between Park and Madison Aves.
Shernaz Kennedy | ShernazKennedy@aol.com | (516) 991 7509

SUN 13

Grade School National Championships
Hilton Anatole 2201 Stemmons Freeway Dallas, Texas
www.USChess.org

SUN 20

PS 116 Chess Tournaments
210 East 33rd St. NYC Between 2nd and 3rd Aves.
Saudin Robovic | www.NYChesskids.com | (315) 849-3332

JANUARY 2010

FRI 8

Columbia Grammar & Preperatory School Friday Chess Tournaments
5 West 93rd Street NYC Between CPW and Columbus Aves.
www.kidschess.com | Sophia Rohde rohderats@aol.com | (212) 749-6200 x151

SAT 9

Browning School Chess Tournaments
52 E. 62nd Street Between Park and Madison Aves.
Shernaz Kennedy | ShernazKennedy@aol.com (516) 991 7509

SUN 10

Hunter College Elementary School
71 East 94TH Street NYC between Park & Madison Ave
Sunil Weeramantry | www.NSCFChess.org

MON 18

PS 116 Chess Tournaments
210 East 33rd St. NYC Between 2nd and 3rd Aves.
Saudin Robovic | www.NYChesskids.com | (315) 849-3332

SUN 24

SAR ACADEMY CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP VIII
655 West 254th Street -Riverdale, NY
www.TriStateChess.com | MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896

PS 6 Chess Tournaments
45 E 81ST St. NYC Between Park & Madison Aves.
Michael Poukchanski | michael@chesskingdom.com

FUTURE ISSUES OF THE CHESS EXCHANGE WILL LIST:
TOP 3 FINISHERS IN EVERY SECTION OF ALL NYC TOURNAMENTS


Page 8

SPEAK YOUR MIND
ON TRI-STATE’S ONLINE DISCUSSION FORUM

Do you have strong opinions about scholastic chess tournaments?

Want to share your ideas?

Have an opinion on scholastic chess competition or the Nationals?

How can you find out what other people are thinking about these ideas?

Speak out on our new discussion forums at www.tristatechess.com
Separate forums for kids (13 and under) and adults
Check out our online discussion forums and let your ideas go…

Classified Ads

UPCOMING Tournaments

SAR ACADEMY CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP VIII
SUNDAY JANUARY 24, 2010
655 West 254th Street Riverdale, NY
www.TriStateChess.com | MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896

RODEPH SHOLOM CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP III
SUNDAY MARCH 7, 2010
7 West 83rd Street (Central Park West) New York, NY
www.TriStateChess.com | MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896

CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP XII
SUNDAY MAY 16, 2010
1458 York Ave (77-78th) New York, NY
www.TriStateChess.com | MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896

SAR ACADEMY CHESS CHAMPIONSHIP IX
SUNDAY JUNE 6, 2010
655 West 254th Street Riverdale, NY
www.TriStateChess.com | MKurtzman@TriStateChess.com | (718) 645-5896